Rainmaker

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Rainmaker

A valuable employee, manager or subcontracted person who brings new business to a company.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Rainmaker

Informal; a facilitator of a deal. The term especially applies to an employee whose sole duty is to bring in new business from wealthy clients. That is, the rainmaker meets with potential clients and convinces them to come to business with the rainmaker's company. See also: Finder's Fee.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

rainmaker

A brokerage firm employee who brings a wealthy client base to the business.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
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Rainmakers understand intuitively how to tell a prospect how they (the rainmakers) are different, but have a very hard time communicating how their firm is different.
Walkenhorst's Rainmakers songs gleefully poked fingers in the eyes of authority figures.
For now though, it seems that job will continue to fall to the rainmakers.
Unfortunately, most law firms trot out (and lionize) only the "finder" model (i.e., the rainmaker) to illustrate what every attorney can become--if they could run faster, if they could leap tall buildings in a single bound and if they were more powerful than a locomotive.
I've used this tool myself, and I've seen it work for many of the most highly effective rainmakers I've worked with as a practice management advisor with The Florida Bar's Law Office Management Assistance Service (LOMAS.)
Start as early in your career as you can to build a network of business contacts, the rainmakers advise.
While most individuals have the potential to contribute to marketing and sales efforts, some stand out as future rainmakers. Certain qualities and skills are required to attract new business--often the same attributes that make a good accountant.
K Street Northwest, a few blocks from the White House, is where many of the high-powered Washington lawyers, lobbyists, and influence peddlers have their offices--the kind of people sometimes referred to as rainmakers, who manipulate legislation and Executive Branch policy to suit the purposes of their corporate clients.
Finley, Kumble has been particularlysuccessful at deploying expolitician "rainmakers,' who peddle their names and connections to prospective clients.
Cherry Hill, NJ, October 18, 2015 --(PR.com)-- National business development and marketing expert Kimberly Rice recently presented "How to Ask for New Business and Seal the Deal," a local program of the ABA-Women Rainmakers committee to a large group of women lawyers.