radon

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radon

Colorless, odorless gas that occurs naturally due to the breakdown of minerals in the earth. It tends to become trapped in our modern, nearly air-tight homes. Since there has been some correlation between radon and lung cancer, the EPA recommends levels no higher than 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), although generally acceptable levels are in the range of 4 to 8 pCi/L. The EPA Web site at www.epa.gov has information on testing for radon and reducing it.

References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Radon gas is constantly flowing up through soil and rock.
"We found then this huge level of radon gas in the house." The Castleisland couple died within a few years of one McCrea another and a survey showed one of the highest values recorded in Europe.
As Samet and Eradze (2000) described it, "In homes, the principal source is soil gas, which penetrates through cracks or sumps in basements or around a concrete slab." Radon can also be present in the groundwater and the use of radon-contaminated well water can result in elevated radon gas levels due to gas released from the water (Teichman, 1988).
The radon release process can be divided into two stages: the formation of free-state radon and the migration of radon gas. In the first stage, radium atoms in underground strata decay by emitting alpha particles, which generate radon atoms.
Daniel Cluff, a physicist and mine engineer, said the ventilation systems in modern mines ensure radon gas does not constitute a health and safety issue.
Radon gas originates from the decay of radium-226 in decay series of uranium-238 which is relatively common in earth's crust.
The participants were also asked about water pollution, environmental tobacco smoke, air pollution, ozone depletion, exposure to radon gas, soil pollution, noise pollution, formaldehyde related with furniture, ground ozone and pesticides etc.
However, the danger of radon gas exposure within properties was only discovered in 1984.
The problem occurs when radon gas enters your home and gets trapped.
Some substances, such as radon gas, are really dangerous, but the ventilation system used in radon mines is
Only a few therapeutic tools have been reported as having both, positive and negative action for human health, such as radon gas. The range of informed actions goes from a mild analgesic effect in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who inhale the gas, to lung cancer in miners (chronic exposition).