Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act


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Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

United States legislation passed in 1970 that increased criminal and civil penalties for participating in organized crime and also strengthened law enforcement tools in the investigation of illegal enterprises. Its provisions included the ability to indict individuals for witness intimidation or extortion, prosecution for acts of terrorism or murder for hire, and so forth. One can be prosecuted under RICO for offenses such as counterfeiting money, securities fraud, and bankruptcy fraud.
References in periodicals archive ?
Filing for injunctive relief under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), CMA alleges that the health plans have used coercive, unfair, and fraudulent means to dominate and control physician-patient relationships for their own financial gain.
This year marks the 30th anniversary of the enactment of the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO).(1) Congress could not possibly have imagined how frequently this law would be used in all areas of civil litigation.
The complaint against United Healthcare alleges violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act and the Employment Retirement Income Security Act.
NOW argued that Joseph Scheidler of the Chicago-based Pro-Life Action League and three other prominent activists had violated the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) by encouraging anti-abortion protests.
This provision is analogous to Section 1964(a) of Title 18 (part of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act).
In dismissing the plaintiffs' securities and RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act) claims, the court said that although the plaintiffs purported to understand the offering to be a "conservative tax-advantage investment," the offering materials explicitly described it as high-risk and speculative and served to "inform [them] of the very matters and risks that they claim were not disclosed."
Lash III, professor of law at George Mason University, responding to class-action lawsuits filed by 14 law firms against seven HMOs, alleging that the HMOs misrepresent their coverage and treatment and violate the civil Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.
A class action suit alleged violation of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act of 1970 (RICO).[18] In this case, the HMO's financial incentive system was alleged to have caused damage.
In Alexander, the Supreme Court evaluated free speech rights in an obscenity case in light of Federal forfeiture laws under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO).