Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

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Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

United States legislation passed in 1970 that increased criminal and civil penalties for participating in organized crime and also strengthened law enforcement tools in the investigation of illegal enterprises. Its provisions included the ability to indict individuals for witness intimidation or extortion, prosecution for acts of terrorism or murder for hire, and so forth. One can be prosecuted under RICO for offenses such as counterfeiting money, securities fraud, and bankruptcy fraud.
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Additionally, the statutory language of the RICO Act itself must be
ramifications in the application of the RICO Act. (112) Courts commonly
The wide-ranging authority and discretion granted to prosecutors through the RICO Act and the material support to terrorism statutes, and to the military through the AUMF, risk inadvertently furthering Al Qaeda's goals by aggregating local guerilla groups with a global insurgency.
* For example, corporations have been sued under the RICO Act for allegedly distributing false advertisements; lawyers, bankers, accountants, and other professionals, have been sued under the RICO Act for allegedly assisting clients in organizing, or assisting in the organization of, schemes to defraud; spouses have been sued for allegedly concealing the value of marital assets in divorce proceedings; and, civil protest groups have been sued for intimidating and extorting the customers of the industries that the protest aimed to disrupt.
If you have been injured by a violation of the RICO Act, you may sue the person who allegedly violated the Act and, if successful, recover a monetary award equivalent to three times the value of the property you lost or that was stolen from you, plus the legal costs and fees you incurred to bring the lawsuit." http://www.lectlaw.com/def/a142.htm, September 29, 2003.)
Only a little more than a decade after the RICO Act's passage, the most famous criminal use of RICO occurred not in the prosecution of a mob figure such as John Gotti, but in Rudolph Guiliani's Wall Street prosecutions of the 1980s.
For example, Press, Shannon, and Ellissimmons noted that federal prosecutors were using the RICO Act against defendants who clearly were not part of any organized crime ring.
But the RICO act is also being invoked in civil suits against Operation Rescue (and other abortion protesters), and while the Philadelphia Inquirer, Wall Street Journal and a half-dozen or so medium-sized newspapers have editorialized against this, most of the major papers - the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune - have ignored it.
Explain how terms like embezzlement, forgery, and the RICO act might apply to this case.
The draft produced by the convention was adopted by the people of Puerto Rico(12) and formally approved by Congress in 1952, with one exception(13) and two provisos.(14) The constitutional convention of Puerto Rico acted immediately to amend the Constitution as mandated by the Congress, and the Constitution of Puerto Rico took effect, after a formal proclamation of the Governor, on July 25, 1952.
Robertson, the Supreme Court left open the question whether individual RICO acts must "substantially affect" interstate commerce.