R-Value Rule

R-Value Rule

Also called “insulation disclosure.” See R-value.
References in periodicals archive ?
Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is calling for comment on the overall costs, benefits, necessity and regulatory/economic impacts of the commission's Trade Regulation Rule Concerning the Labeling and Advertising of Home Insulation, which is commonly referred to as the "R-value Rule."
This is important to members of the nonwovens industry who are involved in the manufacture and/or supply of any sort of home insulation product because, as FTC notes, the R-value Rule covers all products that are "mainly used to slow down heat flow." The current rule, in fact, covers most types and forms of insulation marketed for use in residential structures, even if those products aren't directly cited under the current R-value Rule.
The current R-value Rule applies to home insulation manufacturers, professional installers, retailers who sell insulation to consumers for do-it-yourself installation, and new home sellers, including sellers of manufactured housing.
As noted in the announcement for this action, reliable value ratings for home insulation products were not available from the dawn of the modern industry until FTC first adopted the R-value Rule (16 CFR 460) in 1979 in an effort "to address the failure of the home insulation marketplace to provide essential pre-purchase information to consumers, primarily an insulation product's'R-value.'"
The first version of the current R-value Rule was adopted, according to FTC, in response to a variety of unfair or deceptive actions by the insulation industry.
To address these practices, the current R-value Rule provides substantiation and disclosure requirements for insulation products used in the residential market.
Frequently referred to as the "R-value Rule," 16 CFR Part 460 establishes disclosure, labeling and testing requirements for the residential insulation industry so that consumers receive consistent and accurate information about how well various insulation products restrict the flow of heat ("R-value").
The origins of the R-value Rule date back to the energy crisis of the late 1970s when skyrocketing home heating and cooling prices caused a spike in demand for quality residential insulation products, which in turn led to an increase in the number of firms manufacturing these products.
The R-value Rule, as it came to be known, was eventually implemented in the fall of 1980 and includes requirements related to product labeling and advertising.
The recent changes to the R-value Rule actually stem from a request for comments the FTC issued in 1995 as part of its ongoing regulatory review program.
The final rule also amends the existing affirmative disclosure provisions (which currently exempt television advertising) by exempting radio ads, and increases the current penalty for R-value Rule non-compliance from $10,000 per violation to $11,000 per incident.