Queuing Theory

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Queuing Theory

The use of quantitative measures to balance supply and demand for services in order to minimize wait times. Queuing theory is most beneficial in retail establishments; for example, one may use it to determine how many cashiers to have at the grocery store. It is also called waiting line theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
A novel application of queueing theory on the Caulerpenyne secreted by invasive Caulerpa taxifolia (Vahl) C.Agardh (Ulvophyceae, Caulerpales): a preliminary study.
In light of their results, we got motivated to investigate the theoretical aspects of the processing delay, which led us to develop an analytical model based on the queueing theory.
Thompson, Fundamentals of Queueing Theory, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ, USA, 4th edition, 2008.
When compared to previous agent-based simulations of the emergency department, its basis in queueing theory enabled this model to have a more simple structure that does not necessarily require timing each individual step of the patient care process for each agent but instead allows it to be grouped into a few large queues.
The use of queueing theory methodology will have significant benefits in analysis of these systems.
Harris, Fundamentals of Queueing Theory, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, USA, 2nd edition, 2000.
Queueing theory has been applied to develop analytical methods for evaluating Cloud service performance.
Bhat, An Introduction to Queueing Theory: Modeling and Analysis in Applications, Springer, New York, NY, USA, 2008.
Workload allocation policies for distributed systems are often analysed in terms of queueing theory (see [8] for an introduction to queueing theory).
Fundamentals of Queueing Theory, 4th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken
To develop an evaluation framework for the productivity and cost-efficiencies of these models while controlling for AWTs, we use a systems modeling method called queueing theory (Gross and Harris 1985).