Quarter of Coverage

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Quarter of Coverage

The personal income one must earn in a year to be eligible for one quarter of the Social Security benefits to which one may be entitled. That is, one who earns a quarter of coverage has that year counted as part of his/her working life for calculating benefits after retirement. One cannot earn more than four quarters of coverage per year, regardless of one's income.
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Beneficiaries who have between 30 and 39 quarters of coverage may buy into Part A at a reduced monthly premium rate, which is $234 for 2014, a decrease of $9.
Alternately, Title XVI Supplemental Security Income disability benefits may be awarded to disabled individuals who have not worked or who do not have sufficient quarters of coverage, provided they meet a defined income and resources test.
For example, a person age 27 likely only needs 12 quarters of coverage to be fully insured.
A transitional provision provides credit for retroactive hospital quarters of coverage for federal employees who were employed before 1983 and also on January 1, 1983.
quarters of coverage, not exceeding 40) that the individual has for both Social Security and Medicare Hospital Insurance purposes, and the number the individual needs to be eligible for Social Security benefits and also for Medicare Hospital Insurance coverage.
He is fully insured by: (1) accumulating 40 quarters of coverage (a total of ten years of covered work); or (2) accumulating at least six quarters of coverage provided he has acquired at least as many quarters of coverage as there are years elapsing after 1950 (or, if later, after the year in which he reaches age 21) and before the year in which he becomes disabled.
72 in Social Security taxes would receive four quarters of coverage (4 x 1,120 = 4,480; 4,480 x .
A person becomes insured by acquiring a certain number of quarters of coverage.
Beneficiaries who have less than 30 quarters of coverage would have to pay $432, up $13 from the current $419.
The Court stated that in all likelihood, Nierotko "reflected concern that the benefits scheme created in 1939 would be disserved by allowing an employer's wrongdoing to reduce the quarters of coverage an employee would otherwise be entitled to claim toward eligibility.
As a general rule, fully insured status is obtained once the individual acquires 40 quarters of coverage.
How are quarters of coverage determined for an employee?