Quantitative easing


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Quantitative easing

A monetary policy in which the central bank engages in open market transactions aimed at increasing money supply in the economy. Easing could also involve direct money creation (printing).
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With speculation rife about the Federal Reserve and when - rather than if - it will raise interest rates, combined with suggestions that extended quantitative easing from the European Central Bank is a possibility, there could be opportunities for traders on the horizon.
This study intends to shed light on the subject of quantitative easing and the innate spillovers felt by foreign economies by comparing the results of this analysis with the results of other relevant literature.
Quantitative easing has sent one class of investors in desperate search of yield.
Hence, until the nation is generating 250,000 and 300,00 new jobs per month, for many months, it isn't prudent for the Federal Reserve to even consider decreasing quantitative easing stimulus.
The bank's January's meeting shows a shifting attitude among the UK's central bankers, who are seeking alternatives to the increasingly ineffective quantitative easing programme.
With question marks over the effectiveness of more quantitative easing, the MPC (Monetary Policy Committee) is undoubtedly waiting to see the impact of its Funding for Lending Scheme," he said.
3 trillion of debt in two rounds of so-called quantitative easing.
The minutes of the May MPC meeting suggest that the Bank of England is very much keeping the door open to more quantitative easing, thereby reinforcing the impression coming from the Quarterly Inflation Report," he said.
12) to mention pensions and quantitative easing in the same letter is either audacious or political posturing.
WEST Midland business bosses have urged the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee to increase its Quantitative Easing (QE) programme this week.
THERE is "quite a lot of scope" for a further round of quantitative easing, a senior member of the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee said yesterday.
Ben Broadbent, who joined the bank's Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) in June, added that he was "reasonably close" to voting for increasing the bank's quantitative easing programme, a move which, in itself, would lower the value of the pound.
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