Quantitative easing


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Quantitative easing

A monetary policy in which the central bank engages in open market transactions aimed at increasing money supply in the economy. Easing could also involve direct money creation (printing).
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it added that quantitative easing is highly unlikely.
Reacting to this decision, investment bankers and other finance experts at Afrinvest (West) Africa likened this to Quantitative Easing (QE) that took place in advanced markets, after the 2009 global recession which recorded mixed impact.
Interest rates on sovereign debt have been falling for some time, as the European Central Bank (ECB) pursues a massive quantitative easing program, in which it buys eurozone countries' bonds in an attempt to push up inflation and boost the eurozone economy.
The term has become even more popular in recent times in the wake of the US central bank's quantitative easing (QE) policy and is now being referred to as 'QE for the public'.
The BOK was negative about the idea, but it has been pressured by Cheong Wa Dae and President Park Geun-hye to implement a Korean version of quantitative easing.
The minimum credit quality thresholds will once again apply for Cyprus from 1 April, meaning that Cyprus would have to return to the investment grade of international credit houses in order to benefit from the ECB's quantitative easing programme.
This large-scale operation is more commonly known as quantitative easing or QE.
"Cyprus is eligible for a total of e1/42.2bn throughout the quantitative easing programme," which aims at stimulating the euro area's anaemic growth and helping the ECB meet its medium term inflation target of 2 per cent, Bank of Cyprus said in an emailed statement.
The quantitative easing program pursued by the Fed from 2009 to 2014 has prompted a flood of cash into the oil industry.
Quantitative easing has eased Japanese deflation, but Abenomics stumbles on stimulus and reforms
Athens -- Greek leftwing opposition leader Alexis Tsipras said the European Central Bank (ECB) could not exclude Greece if it decides to move to a full "quantitative easing" programme to stimulate the eurozone's faltering economy.
This work for scholars, economists, non-economists, and policymakers argues that theory, historical experience, and economic indicators point to the likelihood that the US will slide into hyperinflation and asks whether quantitative easing is to blame.
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