Quantify


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Quantify

To express economic, market or other research directly in terms of mathematical data. Quantitative factors include facts such a P/E ratios, GDP growth, and other data that are objectively measurable. See also: Qualitative research.
References in periodicals archive ?
Executive Order 12,866 mandates quantification only when feasible, (35) and agencies subject to it routinely do not quantify benefits and costs of rules.
The SFS uses simulation to analyze market volatility and stresses, incorporating options pricing theory to quantify the year by year risk in real estate transactions.
@UK said it hopes that finance directors and procurement professionals within the public service will try it out and quantify the expected savings and return on investment (ROI) available to them.
But more likely he will be trying to quantify something that is not quantifiable.
Indirect and direct methods can be used to quantify virus delivered in mosquito saliva.
41, even though it would not be able to quantify precisely the overpayment because the credit study is incomplete.
Essentially, this meant classifying product design features that significantly affect assembly times and manufacturing costs and to quantify these effects." While someone might therefore imagine that DFMA is, well, old-school, consider the three points that Boothroyd described in that paper as the purpose of the process:
Now official agencies are beginning to quantify health impacts of emissions specifically related to port-related activities.
The main advantage of these techniques is the ease of sample preparation; however, it is often difficult to quantify the resulting surface roughness of the sample.
These papers are the outcome of the Quantifying Human Information Processing Capabilities project, which sought to quantify information flow in the nervous system, the limits of that flow and its response to emotions.
He claims that his calculations are the first to quantify radiation-based risks to wounded soldiers from dissolving shrapnel and to civilians living near battlefields.
However, the use of flow cytometry (FCM) now enables us to quantify the amount of binder-rich particles and to investigate the aggregation of such particles.