Qualitative research

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Qualitative research

Traditional analysis of firm-specific prospects for future earnings. It may be based on data collected by the analysts, there is no formal quantitative framework used to generate projections.

Qualitative Research

Economic and/or market research into areas not directly related to mathematical data. Qualitative research is based on the assumption that economic actors, being human beings, are susceptible to acting on factors that may not directly correlate with facts. Qualitative research may look into management practices or brand recognition when recommending investment decisions to clients or brokers. See also: Assurance, Panic selling, Quantitative research.
References in periodicals archive ?
More courses had an orientation toward quantitative methods than toward qualitative methods. The number of courses with an explicit orientation toward evaluation was, to all appearances, fairly limited.
Therefore, the book serves two complementary purposes; it provides a readable overview of debates on qualitative methods and also provides a practical guide to doing qualitative research.
Gillian Symon and Catharine Cassell (eds.): Qualitative Methods and Analysis in Organizational Research: A Practical Guide
She might even have been hired to teach feminist theory and qualitative methods and told by those not sharing her perspective (either feminism or qualitative methods) that she was indeed welcome.
This Special Supplement Issue of Health Services Research draws attention to the growing role played by qualitative methods in health services research.
An international forum for research using qualitative methods to examine human behavior in natural settings, the Journal of Contemporary Ethnography explores a variety of topics, providing valuable insights into everyday experiences.
One of the best ways to measure the extent to which your customers are satisfied is to talk directly to them, using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A quantitative measure would be gathering information through a written or telephone survey (as we discussed in last month's installment of this series).
"Qualitative Methods: Their History in Sociology and Anthropology." Denzin and Lincoln 23-59.
For example, at an early exploratory stage of research, qualitative methods allow the researcher to become familiar with the area(s) of interest, explore the field and consider the dimensions involved because of their open-ended, non-pre-ordained nature.
Data that focus on the extent to which graduates find their jobs fulfilling were collected using qualitative methods (Bogdan and Taylor, 1975; Spradley, 1979).
Qualitative Methods for Health Research, 4th Edition
A very important aspect of using qualitative methods is the ability of the data collectors to recognize what they see and to listen carefully to what is said and unsaid by the participants.

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