Pylon


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Pylon

A large tower containing power lines. Pylons are used in the operations of some utility companies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new bridge's three pylons have already become landmarks on the Mersey.
The Scottish Government came up with PS5million of environmental measures designed to partially offset the impact of the pylons, including treeplanting and building paths.
The man came down at around midnight and following the incident, a police spokesperson said: "The man who had climbed up the pylon is now down safely and has been taken to hospital to be checked over.
Around 36,900 homes were left without power as the electricity provider worked to divert electricity from the Killingworth pylons via alternative routes.
The project will see hundreds of 60-metre pylons, as tall as Liberty Hall in Dublin, erected across rural areas and in almost every county from Donegal to Cork.
Paddy - dad to Abraham, five, Saoirse, four, and two-year-old Aine - came home in 2012 and was so concerned by the destruction it would cause the local environment that he helped set up antipylon campaign group ReThink Pylons.
Sarah said: "I'm proud of working for National Grid and when the opportunity arose to climb a pylon and for a very worthy cause I leapt at the chance.
If testing is successful, the design is set to take over from the traditional steel lattice pylons that have been part of the British landscape since the 1920s.
The designs for the new pylons were decided as part of an international competition organised by the Department of Energy &Climate Change, Royal Institute of British Architects and National Grid.
In 2008, Mitsubishi awarded a contract to Spirit AeroSystems to design and build pylons for both the MRJ70 and MRJ90 aircraft models.
The insulated Cross-arms enable increased electricity supply using the same pylons or the use of smaller pylons when building a new electricity line.
More diverse in style and attitude, British visual artists could hardly be described as a school of 'pylon painters', but the pylon quite literally looms over some of the most interesting landscapes exhibited in Britain between the First and Second World Wars.