sequestration

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sequestration

the confiscation of an organization's assets by a court following contempt of court by the organization. Its assets come under the control of a sequestrator, usually an accountant, until the organization can show that it has purged its contempt. Sequestration can be used to ensure that funds are available to pay any fines resulting from the contempt of court. In the late 1980s a number of TRADE UNIONS were subject to sequestration orders, in most cases as a result of violating the law on SECONDARY ACTION and strike ballots.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

sequestration

the holding of part of the ASSETS of parties involved in an INDUSTRIAL DISPUTE or other dispute by a third party (the sequestrator) until the dispute is settled. Sequestrators are often appointed by the courts as a means of enforcing fines against TRADE UNIONS who are in breach of employment legislation.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
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[sup][7] And we again ascertained the predominant feature of dramatically increase of PMN pulmonary sequestration and NE release in the VILI model.
(2) In the current case, the diagnosis was intralobar pulmonary sequestration located in the right lower lobe.
Patient 2 CT chest--right lower lobe Right lower Figure 2 pulmonary sequestration. lobectomy A CT arteriogram showed a single aberrant artery arising from the anterior right lateral aspect of the thoracic aorta at the level of T10 supplying the right lower lobe pulmonary sequestration Patient 3 Chest X-ray--a vague Left lower Figure 3, opacity in the lower lobe lobectomy.
Approximately 30% of patients with pericardial agenesis have additional anomalies such as atrial septal defect, bicuspid aortic valve, patent ductus arteriosus, tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary sequestration, bronchogenic cyst and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (2, 3).
This factor is known to play a significant role in the frequent misdiagnoses of pulmonary hamartoma (18) and in rare cases of pulmonary sequestration (15); in both lesions, the culprit is the abundant benign cohesive epithelium often misinterpreted as well-differentiated adenocarcinoma.