social products

(redirected from Public goods)
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Related to Public goods: externalities

social products

or

merit goods

or

public goods

the GOODS and SERVICES that are provided by the state for the benefit of all or most of the populace (education, health, housing, etc.). Unlike PRIVATE PRODUCTS, there is no direct link between the consumption of a social product and payment for it. Social products are paid for out of general taxation and not by individual consumers buying in the market place. See also COLLECTIVE PRODUCTS.
References in classic literature ?
Under such a regulation, it may well happen that the public voice, pronounced by the representatives of the people, will be more consonant to the public good than if pronounced by the people themselves, convened for the purpose.
FEDERAL tax revenues rebounded in the first quarter of the current financial year on the back of a growing economy supported by public goods and, no less important, by a surge in voluntary direct tax payments.
The move towards a public goods approach is part of a fourpoint plan, which also includes developing a proper food policy and giving farmers time and tools to adapt to the future to avoid the Brexit "cliff edge".
The country's two biggest revenue agencies posted double-digit growth in their tax collections last year, which was matched by a similar pace of increase in state spending on public goods and services, according to Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III.
The author points towards the limits to procure public goods through tax-money, proposes to rely on consumer demand for public good (as if it exists or can be created and is free of commons problems), and reminds that a rational farmer would automatically capture such market and maintain the quality of their land, if they intend to remain in the business.
Here, I present research using the secretion of public goods in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to tackle this issue.
We first draw attention to the early literature investigating the provision of public goods and to the successive theoretical analysis.
It is widely accepted in recent work in economics and political science that ethnic diversity has a negative impact on the provision of public goods such as health and education.
Groups can be aided in their struggle to produce public goods by institutions, such as communication, framing, or sanction.
But what is even more worrying is the signal the World Bank is sending: That it will no longer support the underfunded global public goods that are crucial to preserving the social, economic, and political progress of the last century.
Because public goods are nonexcluable, free riders would skip paying for the production of such goods in an anarchic state of nature, so they would not be produced in sufficient quantity, if at all.
It examines structural differences in methods of public goods allocation, namely the deduction as opposed to direct government transfer and provision.

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