development

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Related to Psychosocial development: Cognitive development

development

see NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT.

development

The process of improving raw land.

References in periodicals archive ?
Scores of the positive stages of psychosocial development were higher in the fertile than the infertile group.
Results from computerised regression analyses of siblings of the original study participants supported the hypothesis that the less favourable psychosocial development of unwanted pregnancy subjects (at least partially) was due to unwantedness, not shared by their siblings.
The other links hunger with the cognitive, academic, and psychosocial development of school-age children.
A significant finding is that counselors can facilitate career development by assisting clients with psychosocial development.
Surely we cannot oppose children witnessing executions for fear of damaging their psychosocial development.
In addition, it was found that camp participation fosters Erikson's psychosocial development of industry over inferiority through skill mastery and self-accomplishment through independent diabetes self-care.
The process of transformation is presented as overcoming normality and returning to wholeness, within a schema incorporating Kundalini psychophysiology, ego and psychosocial development, and psychospiritual unfolding.
CHCA in the South Bronx provides 4 weeks of training--twice the federal requirement--and emphasizes communication, problem solving, psychosocial development, and job readiness, in addition to all the clinical skills required by regulation.
A child with optimal psychosocial development will be achieving developmental tasks on schedule, have a strong sense of self and social competence, and will be performing academically to the best of his or her ability.
The report said that violence arises from the "interactions among individuals' psychosocial development, neurological and hor-monal differences, and social processes.
And will not her "resolutely single status" threaten the normal psychosocial development of the child?

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