Proxy Directive

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Proxy Directive

A legal document giving an assignee the ability to make medical decisions on behalf of the assignor in the event of the assignor's mental or physical incapacity. A proxy directive is made while the assignor is still competent, and comes into effect at incapacity. A proxy directive gives far-reaching powers; for example, the form for a proxy directive in the state of New Jersey states allows the assignee the ability to "provide, withhold or withdraw life-sustaining measures" from the assignor. It is important to note that a proxy directive does not allow the assignee access to the assignor's finances, nor obliges the assignee to pay for any treatment. See also: Power of attorney.
References in periodicals archive ?
Proxy directives like the Tennessee Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care (DPAHC) or Health Care Agent form may be a better document, especially for those that would rather defer decision making to another.
Second, we should prefer "proxy directives" to living wills: "Instead of attempting to specify what should be done, advance proxy directives should specify who should make crucial decisions on our behalf.
Instruction (or treatment) directives state the individual's wishes, while proxy directives name a person to act on the individual's behalf to make health care decisions for the individual in the event that he or she becomes incapacitated.
States have enacted laws that give legal recognition to "living wills" -- instruction directives and proxy directives -- yet people are not required to have them.