Proxy Directive


Also found in: Medical.

Proxy Directive

A legal document giving an assignee the ability to make medical decisions on behalf of the assignor in the event of the assignor's mental or physical incapacity. A proxy directive is made while the assignor is still competent, and comes into effect at incapacity. A proxy directive gives far-reaching powers; for example, the form for a proxy directive in the state of New Jersey states allows the assignee the ability to "provide, withhold or withdraw life-sustaining measures" from the assignor. It is important to note that a proxy directive does not allow the assignee access to the assignor's finances, nor obliges the assignee to pay for any treatment. See also: Power of attorney.
References in periodicals archive ?
Proxy directive (Power of Attorney): written document that legally appoints someone to make decisions regarding property, financial affairs and/or personal care.
If the patient does not have a court-appointed guardian and has a valid proxy directive, the proxy will be the patient's surrogate decision-maker as established by the directive.
A durable power of attorney for health care is the most common type of proxy directive. This power of attorney allows the designation of a surrogate medical decision maker of the patient's choosing.
For all participants, dependent measures included attitudes toward end-of-life planning, comfort with end-of-life planning, knowledge about the health care proxy directive, and knowledge about the role of the agent.
Proxy directives like the Tennessee Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care (DPAHC) or Health Care Agent form may be a better document, especially for those that would rather defer decision making to another.