prototype

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prototype

an early, pre-market, model of a product which is being developed. Small numbers of prototypes of new products are often constructed to aid the process of testing the performance and consumer acceptability of the product prior to deciding whether or not to engage in full-scale commercial production and marketing of the product. See NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in periodicals archive ?
Release 2018.12 features new HES board HES-XCVU9P-ZU7EV support including a comprehensive collection of FPGA prototyping resources, such as Vivado board definitions and sample designs.
Done at the right development stages, virtual prototyping can speed up the design process by providing certainty that the design is correct.
More than 75% say they rely on short-run, low-volume external PCB prototyping services, and 73% say they go through at least two, and often more than three, iterations before reaching the final prototyping and testing phase.
20 July 2018 - Wisconsin, US-based additive manufacturing service bureau Midwest Prototyping, LLC has acquired the former rapid prototyping division of Wisconsin-based Tenere Inc.
"Prototyping is typically a fast-paced project, with the goal of ironing out any product design issues," said John Ruggieri, vice president of engineering and business development for Seabrook Medical, a Seabrook, N.H.-based contract manufacturer of precision instruments, implants, and other orthopedic devices.
Industries such as construction, architecture, packaging, medical, aeronautics, robotics, automotive and aerospace can now obtain a fast and creative solution to prototyping dilemmas from Foamlinx thanks to its latest investment in innovative and modern technology.
Prototyping's role in the capability development process appears to be changing, expanding from focused design tool to potentially paradigm-changing methodology.
Engineers who grew up using these cut-and-try techniques may view rapid prototyping as an improvement over their traditional process.
However, in some medical technology companies, those talents are restricted when the engineering department is disconnected from other solution-oriented departments such as prototyping and manufacturing.
Prototyping, or the ability to produce a part or product directly from an electronic file, is a case in point.