property dividend

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Property Dividend

A dividend paid to shareholders in anything other than cash. Common property dividends include shipping the company's product to shareholders and giving out certificates in stocks in other companies held by the company. They are taxed like cash dividends at the fair market value of whatever property is paid out. See also: Payment-in-Kind.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

property dividend

A stockholder dividend paid in a form other than cash, scrip, or the firm's own stock. For example, a firm may distribute samples of its own product or shares in another company it owns to its stockholders. In general, a property dividend is taxable at its fair market value.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the law, all government-owned or controlled corporations are required to declare and remit at least 50%of their annual net earnings as cash, stock or property dividends to the national government.
"Likewise corresponding cash dividends earned amounting to P403.481 million and P358.446 million as at December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively and property dividends of 9,488,394 shares of stock in Rockwell Land Corporation were still unpaid to LBP," the audit agency said.
Domingo explained that every year, the agency remitted cash dividends to national coffers, pursuant to Republic Act 7656, which required government-owned and controlled corporations (GOCCs) to remit at least 50 percent of their annual net earnings as cash, stock or property dividends to the national government.
Also, the measure said a final tax rate of 15 percent (from 10 percent) shall be imposed upon the cash and/or property dividends actually or constructively received by an individual from a domestic corporation or from a joint stock company, insurance, mutual fund companies, collective investment schemes and regional operating headquarters of multinational companies, or on the share of an individual in the distributable net income after tax of a partnership (except a general professional partnership) of which he is a partner, or on the share of an individual in the net income after tax of an association, a joint account, or a joint venture or consortium taxable as a corporation of which he is a member or co-venturer.
Retained earnings are the sum total of a corporation's accumulated net income (or loss), gains and losses and prior period adjustments, reduced by its cash dividends, property dividends, stock dividends and other amounts transferred to the contributed capital accounts.
Under the law, all state-controlled corporations should declare and remit at least 50% of their annual net earnings to the national government as cash, stock or property dividends.
PAGCOR remits cash dividends to government coffers, pursuant to Republic Act 7656, which requires government-owned and controlled corporations (GOCCs) to remit at least 50 percent of their annual net earnings as cash, stock or property dividends to the national government.
plans to issue property dividends to its shareholders in the form of shares in its water and hydro-electric businesses.
After the property dividends, 29.81 percent of shares of Phil Hydro and 25.84 percent of Tubig are now owned by the public shareholders of Jolliville.
Under Section 3 of RA 7656 or the Dividend Law, "all government-owned or controlled corporations (GOCCs) shall declare and remit at least 50 percent of their annual net earnings as cash, stock or property dividends to the national government.
GOCCs are required by law to declare and remit at least half of their yearly net earnings as cash, stock or property dividends to the government.
All GOCCs are required to declare and remit at least 50% of their annual net earnings as cash, stock and/or property dividends to the national government.
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