promotion

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promotion

  1. the means of bringing products to the attention of consumers and persuading them to buy those products. See PROMOTIONAL MIX, ADVERTISING, SALES PROMOTION, MERCHANDIZING, PERSONAL SELLING, PACKAGING, PUBLIC RELATIONS, CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVES.
  2. the elevation of a person to a position of greater authority and responsibility. See ORGANIZATION CHART.
References in classic literature ?
We do not know whether he lived long enough for a chance of that promotion whose way was so arduous.
Sancho, my friend," replied Don Quixote, "sometimes proportion may be as good as promotion.
The first was from the Admiral to inform his nephew, in a few words, of his having succeeded in the object he had undertaken, the promotion of young Price, and enclosing two more, one from the Secretary of the First Lord to a friend, whom the Admiral had set to work in the business, the other from that friend to himself, by which it appeared that his lordship had the very great happiness of attending to the recommendation of Sir Charles; that Sir Charles was much delighted in having such an opportunity of proving his regard for Admiral Crawford, and that the circumstance of Mr.
She could not have supposed it in the power of any concurrence of circumstances to give her so many painful sensations on the first day of hearing of William's promotion.
With the same anxious forethought he wrote a letter of instructions to Captain Thorn, in which he urged the strictest attention to the health of himself and his crew, and to the promotion of good-humor and harmony on board his ship.
A few weeks after the famous fight of Waterloo, and after the Gazette had made known to her the promotion and gallantry of that distinguished officer, the Dieppe packet brought over to Miss Crawley at Brighton, a box containing presents, and a dutiful letter, from the Colonel her nephew.
Rawdon's promotion, and the honourable mention made of his name in the Gazette, filled this good Christian lady also with alarm.
To be so sent meant not only a reward but an important step toward promotion.
I staked my life in the fever swamps of Africa, to gain the promotion that I only desired for her sake--and gained it.
My lady got me put under the bailiff, and I did my best, and gave satisfaction, and got promotion accordingly.
Critics say the policy has delayed promotions of countless officers, decreased morale and placed increased scrutiny on officers who already have paid for their wrongdoing.