Right to Privacy

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Right to Privacy

The right not to be violated without one's consent. For example, the right to privacy includes the right to be secure in one's own person or home. The right to privacy in guaranteed in many jurisdictions. Other jurisdictions that do not explicitly provide a right to privacy may provide some protections. For example, a government may prohibit searches in a private area without a warrant.
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The dataset was extracted from the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse database by issuing the following query:
But new and sophisticated technologies make it imperative that the federal government respect Americans' privacy rights and obtain warrants when conducting aerial surveillance in the United States.
Globalization in entertainment, technology, security, civil and privacy rights converge after Sony hacking; incident puts global attention on "The Interview"
The FCC's investigation unit found that Verizon had failed to inform nearly 2 million new and returning customers of their privacy rights during their initial enrollment in 2012; the company also failed to notify the FCC of the failure to do so.
The government also argues that Americans' privacy rights are further diminished in this context because the NSA's has a "paramount" interest in examining information that crosses international borders.
The case followed complaints from a man in Spain who argued that when Google's search results revealed details about an auction of his repossessed home that infringed on his privacy rights.
The case underlines the battle between advocates of free expression and supporters of privacy rights, who say people should have the "right to be forgotten" meaning that they should be able to remove their digital traces from the Internet.
US delegate Elizabeth Cousens told the committee that the United States was pleased to support 'privacy rights and the right to freedom of expression'.
She finds that people are granted greater protection of their proprietary privacy rights than of their decisional privacy rights, a situation out of step with the theoretical understanding of privacy.
Roughly $3 million of that was set aside for attorney's fees, with the rest going to establish a charitable group focused on online privacy rights.
Retailers should be aware that sending such personal information to the state is not required by law and is a blatant violation of gun-owner privacy rights.
While government, mass media, and technology threaten individual privacy rights, the law struggles to keep up with the rapid changes taking place.