Right to Privacy

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Right to Privacy

The right not to be violated without one's consent. For example, the right to privacy includes the right to be secure in one's own person or home. The right to privacy in guaranteed in many jurisdictions. Other jurisdictions that do not explicitly provide a right to privacy may provide some protections. For example, a government may prohibit searches in a private area without a warrant.
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In any event, privacy rights would not confer immunity from the law.
Rather than being a marginal burden on Davis's privacy rights, the physical injury requirement dispositively burdened them, as it would for any right that can only be remedied retrospectively.
Conservatives find fundamental rights analysis useful because it frequently provides the rationale for state court rulings in family law cases.(27) It is, for example, the basis for the Alabama appeals court declaration that family integrity is a fundamental right(28) and a Louisiana appeals court ruling that "traditional Louisiana Family Law" promoted and protected the family unit by establishing a family privacy right based upon a liberty right and a constitutional due process right of privacy.(29) These rulings illustrate how both traditional jurisprudence and explicit declarations of rights and liberties provide a substantive due process conception of privacy rights, based on common law understandings of family law, which conservatives use to limit state power.
[26] With safeguards in place to protect the legal and privacy rights of citizens, organizations can use biometric systems with the cooperation of the public.
This rigorous investigation of the ongoing debate between privacy and the public right to know at times lapses into excessive detail, but None of Your Damn Business provides excellent background information for citizens concerned with the erosion of privacy rights, as well as for government officials and legal professionals positioned to act upon privacy laws that protect citizens while providing necessary oversight.
10173, also known as Data Privacy Act, the government is also mandated to protect the privacy rights while ensuring a free flow of information to promote innovation and growth.
It's not surprising, however, that a public official might think about privacy rights when required by ethics disclosure laws to make considerable amounts of personal financial information public.
This is followed by the hand-wringing about transferring data across international borders, about the European Union's privacy rights that fall into place on May 25 this year, and about cyber thieves.
This article reports on a detailed analysis of the unintended data disclosures reported in the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse's comprehensive database of data breaches since 2005.
"Congress recently voted to strip Americans of their privacy rights by voting for SJR34, a resolution that allows Internet Service Providers to collect, and sell your sensitive data without your consent or knowledge," Collins wrote on the (https://www.gofundme.com/BuyCongressData) GoFundMe page .
Privacy Rights in the Digital Age (ISBN: 978-1619257474, 600 pp., $165) is an encyclopedia discussing the challenges that technological advances bring to privacy.