work

(redirected from Prisoners' rights)
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Work

1. To perform a task, especially in exchange for compensation or the potential for profit. Working is necessary for any economy to function.

2. See: Job.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

work

see JOB, LABOUR, WORK ORGANIZATION, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK, HOMEWORKING, DOMESTIC LABOUR.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

work

see JOB.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
MPs threw out prisoners' right to vote but they have also thrown down the gauntlet to Europe.
The committee members also tackled the problem of prisons, proposing minimum standards and a common set of prisoners' rights in the EU.
Undaunted, Judy organized the HIV/Hepatitis C in Prison (HIP) Committee within California Prison Focus, a statewide prisoners' rights organization.
At age 31 she's a veteran AIDS and prisoners' rights activist, and she's storming the radio dial with the same force she used in scaling the ivory tower.
She has fought tirelessly, at great personal risk, for children's, women's and prisoners' rights. She represented the families of intellectuals and writers murdered in 1998-99 and worked to expose those responsible for the death of student activists in 1999.
If I hadn't experienced first-hand just how vacant the promise of human rights is in prison, I would be the first person to suggest that perhaps all the good-intentioned recommendations of the various government commissions could be implemented through legal pressure to have prisoners' rights upheld.
PRISONERS' rights groups yesterday welcomed a legal victory which looks likely to give inmates greater freedom to contact the Press to talk about prison issues.
FAMILIES of victims of the Omagh bombing yesterday confronted protesters from the Real IRA political wing as they demonstrated over prisoners' rights.
My purpose here is to briefly reflect on certain events during three decades of prisoners' rights activism: first, the early days of activism in California, through which I identify seven organizing and unifying principles, and second, more recent activities in Canada.
Meanwhile, prisoners' rights have been eroded, as everything from conjugal visits to law libraries have been eliminated.
The authorities even ignore the ruling of Supreme Court regarding prisoners' rights.'
The Committee for Protecting Prisoners' Rights said that the assault had taken place following a protest staged by the inmates.