Printing Block

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Printing Block

A wooden block used to print ink onto paper. This was used in printing before the invention of the movable type.
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The members took photos around the museum and then carved printing blocks, which they used to make the bags.
The 1917 Proclamations were printed by Cumann na mBan with the original printing blocks used for the original version after they were gathered from the wreckage of the GPO.
He went on to Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art in Dundee, where he studied illustration and printmarking with a particular interest in lino-cut - the carving of linoleum to create printing blocks.
Several new features apply to printing blocks and quilts.
Give students time to incise and print five printing blocks. Have students mount the finished prints in series on a piece of poster board.
and sent the printing blocks to the printing facilities owned by the Ciner Media Group, but the daily was not printed.
HISTORIC printing blocks carved by master engraver Thomas Bewick are to be pressed into service to raise the profile of his birthplace.
First used to print money by Franklin in 1737, the blocks were made by pressing a sage leaf into plaster to create a mold, which was then used to cast printing blocks from type metal.
This unusual technique is the work of Andy Rouse, who first experimented with print and old fashioned printing blocks at college in Camberwell, part of London's University of Arts.
The printing blocks were made in the eleventh month of the year of the white hare (1591/1592); no day is mentioned.
The thirty-two picture essays and charts inserted in the chapters provide images and detailed information about some important cultural achievements and artifacts of Korea, including the gold decoration from the funerary headwear of King Muryong from the Three Kingdoms period, the pagodas at Pulguk-sa built in the eighth century, printing blocks for the Korean Tripitaka made in the thirteenth century, an inlaid celadon jar produced in the twelfth or thirteenth century, and a wooden mask from the fourteenth or fifteenth century.
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