Printing Block

(redirected from Printing Blocks)

Printing Block

A wooden block used to print ink onto paper. This was used in printing before the invention of the movable type.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his small shingled studio--crowded with printing blocks, sketches for future projects, a small press, worktables, and carving tools--Killion quickly found the lodgepole print and pulled it out.
Give students time to incise and print five printing blocks.
and sent the printing blocks to the printing facilities owned by the Ciner Media Group, but the daily was not printed.
PRINTING blocks carved by master engraver Thomas Bewick are to be pressed into service to raise the profile of his Northumberland birthplace.
HISTORIC printing blocks carved by master engraver Thomas Bewick are to be pressed into service to raise the profile of his birthplace.
First used to print money by Franklin in 1737, the blocks were made by pressing a sage leaf into plaster to create a mold, which was then used to cast printing blocks from type metal.
This unusual technique is the work of Andy Rouse, who first experimented with print and old fashioned printing blocks at college in Camberwell, part of London's University of Arts.
As to the issue of manuscripts imitating xylographs, these may be copies of prints or modeled after prints, but usually a xylograph itself is a reproduction of a calligraphic handwriting, and it is certain that well-made new printing blocks may produce clear and shag) lines.
One which really caught my eye was London-based St James's Printing Blocks (Stamps), where Brazilian-born Marco was giving demonstrations of how his bronze-cast stamps work their magic.
Yet most of the Foundling Hospital's textile fragments are printed in a single colour, which was cheaper; the patterns often produced by nails hammered into wooden printing blocks to create sprig-like or shell-like effects.
His Concrete, is made up of around 80,000 tiny rubber printing blocks, showing Arabic and English characters and numbers which have then been over-painted in industrial yellow paint to resemble a traffic bollard or sleeper, (estimate: $7,000-10,000).
The thirty-two picture essays and charts inserted in the chapters provide images and detailed information about some important cultural achievements and artifacts of Korea, including the gold decoration from the funerary headwear of King Muryong from the Three Kingdoms period, the pagodas at Pulguk-sa built in the eighth century, printing blocks for the Korean Tripitaka made in the thirteenth century, an inlaid celadon jar produced in the twelfth or thirteenth century, and a wooden mask from the fourteenth or fifteenth century.
Full browser ?