Primary Election

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Primary Election

An election in which candidates compete against members of their own party to receive the nomination for a political office. The nominee then goes on to face candidates from other parties. The rules in primary elections vary by both party and jurisdiction. In some U.S. states, for example, one needs a plurality to win the primary; in others, a plurality win leads to a run-off election between the two top contenders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Before 2008, the process had not received much scrutiny because the primary races weren't close and the party usually knew who the nominee would be before the primary election.
Under the top-two system, minor-party candidates would compete with all the others on the primary election ballot, and would not advance unless they finished first or second.
Another key concern for the state's 50+ covered in the primary election guides - what will candidates do to expand home and community-based services for an aging population.
a) Supreme, Appellate and Circuit Judges shall [begin strikehrough]be nominated at primary elections or by petition.
The 2002 Florida primary election revealed one of the most troubling vulnerabilities of our election system: strains on the elections workforce on which all polling place operations depend.
Only 35 percent of Oregon's registered voters cast ballots in last month's primary election.
Primary Election An election held by a political party to determine the party's candidate in a general election
Harris County's primary election also marked the first use of Rally, a Hart InterCivic application for the eSlate System that supports secure electronic transmission of cast vote records from geographically distributed tabulation centers.
The political parties would be sweating over primary elections and the precinct, county and Senate district elections that follow.
Here's our next reform: The Independent Party will conduct a membership-wide secure Internet primary election (e-vote) of its 55,000 members in July to choose its nominees (and cross-nominees) for November.
Those opposed include the state's Republican and Democratic political parties, who stand to lose from having open primary elections.
The timeliness of the bill is underscored by the recent primary elections in Florida that revealed that first generation touch screen voting systems thrust into service in response to the 2000 election difficulties have numerous failure modes that resemble the errors made by older punch card and lever machines they were based on.