price taker

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Price Taker

An investor who makes orders that are not large enough to affect the price. That is, when price takers make orders, they must accept the price offered by another investor. A price taker may be an individual or a (small) company. A price taker contrasts with a price maker, which makes orders of sufficient quantity to affect the market price.

price taker

a FIRM that sells its output at a fixed PRICE that is determined by market forces (as in PERFECT COMPETITION) or by government-imposed PRICE CONTROLS.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the absence of loan supply from sponsor-driven M&As, CLOs may remain price-takers and legacy borrowers could undertake dividend recapitalisations, so long as expected recoveries on new senior instruments remain consistent with coverage tests.
Most economies will be price-takers. Those other economies that are harmed or likely to be harmed could take measures to protect their own interests.
Analysts said, 'Metro's deposit funding cost is now comparable to UK high street banks but we remain unconvinced that this represents an enduring competitive advantage, as we expect challenger banks to ultimately be price-takers in the deposit market.'
Wu, "Optimal pricing strategies under co-existence of price-takers and bargainers in a supply chain," Journal of the Operational Research Society, vol.
Fishers involved in the trade across the Philippines are 'price-takers,' and poverty remains widespread in their communities.
He added: "We are encouraging the EU to take action to make sure farmers are not just price-takers but also a price-maker.
(2) Japan, according to Miles Kahler, has acted since the 1980s in a way "that might change the existing system by its behavior, as a 'price maker' rather than a 'price taker.'" (3) While leading players in global affairs, such as the great powers, are usually "price-makers of the system," it is conversely assumed that adjusting to accommodate the actions of these price makers is the perennial role of the smaller states, "the price-takers in the system." (4) This notion is often deployed by policy elites, particularly in the tiny Southeast Asian city-state of Singapore, whose population numbers 5 million and, with 714 square kilometers of land area, is less than half the size of London.
They're frequently price-takers on both ends, wielding little clout with their suppliers or customers.
The simulation of the joint markets yields the demand for permits, resulting from electricity producers' unabated emissions as they behave a` la Cournot in the electricity market but behave as price-takers in the permit market.
They are not the passive "price-takers" depicted by orthodox economic models but more or less consciously collude.
The concentration of processing and distribution companies must not reduce dairy farmers to "mere price-takers" and must not restrict opportunities for final consumers to benefit fairly from decreases in prices.