price range

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Price range

The interval between the high and low prices over which a stock has traded over a particular period of time.

Price Range

The high and low prices between which a security trades over a given period of time. The size of the price range is an indicator of volatility, with a large price range showing a great deal of volatility and a low range showing the opposite. A price range is also called simply a range.

price range

See range.
References in periodicals archive ?
44% of all closings are in this price range, and with a 14.5% increase in inventory YOY, now 45% of home inventory lies within the sweet spot.
Lapena said the average price range of P13,000 per gram was monitored from June 30, when Mr.
HONG KONG: Samsonite International sold shares at the bottom end of a revised price range in its Hong Kong initial public offering (IPO), raising HK$9.73 billion ($1.25 billion) for the company and shareholders, two people with knowledge of the IPO said.
Axiom Limited's price range for its upcoming IPO will be set at $0.80 to $1.15.
Of the nearly 100 houses on the market now, the median price currently fluctuates between $325,000 and $340,000, with more than 40 houses offered in the price range of $200,000-$325,000.
After all, where else can you find more than 100 lodges that provide fishing on lakes, rivers and oceans, price ranges from $50 to $5,000, self-guided to pampered angling vacations, and some of the wildest, grandest country on earth?
Beyond that, the possibilities are endless: channels segmented by language, are groups, special interests, and cost, with programming tiered in different price ranges.
Each restaurant is provided with basic information included price ranges, meals served, styles of cuisine, local history, dining atmosphere, decor, and variety of foods offered.
Brookfield stated that sometimes its common shares trade in price ranges that do not reflect their value.
Beck said, "The record prices and the rising dominant price ranges for large apartments show that, even in the midst of economic flux and political uncertainties, Manhattan coops, especially luxury units, prove to be sturdy investments."
First-time buyers have remained a pillar of the local housing market, but in the more recent years, 1994 to date, the recovery has extended to the higher price ranges of single-family houses and to the condominium sector as well.
The most popular price range for those transactions.