Market correction

(redirected from Price Correction)

Market correction

A relatively short-term drop in stock market prices, generally viewed as bringing overpriced stocks back to a level closer to companies' actual values.

Market Correction

A drop in the price of a security when that security has been overbought and therefore overpriced. Market corrections are usually short-term and are necessary for the stability of the security.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mees attributes the Bend price correction to problems with the national economy hitting when Bend had a huge amount of overdevelopment.
One of the key challenges that buyers and sellers will face in 2008 is how to deal with the current price correction taking place," said Susan M.
But property may be through the worst of its price correction.
The price correction could not be to the full amount because we bought our gas 12 months in advance.
The softening of the housing market also is playing into a general slowing of the aluminum market, although there doesn't appear to be any signs of a major price correction.
9 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- The third- quarter update of the Global Insight/National City Housing Valuation Analysis released today shows 38% of the top 299 metro housing markets are extremely overvalued and at risk for a price correction.
The most recent price correction in the San Fernando Valley began in November 1989 and lasted until February 1997.
3 billion in oil proceeds have been devoted to a stabilization fund to protect against eventual price correction, and the government aims for developed country income status by 2020.
Prices could not be sustained at the exceptionally high levels we have seen over recent years and a price correction was needed.
The United Financial Group says: "The sharp acceleration of the oil price correction could be helpful in cooling Duma appetites for higher GDP and federal revenue forecasts".
said advances in those issues reflect the facts that the Nasdaq rose for a second straight day Friday and that the Japanese technology sector has already seen a major price correction between January and March.
The odd feature of the Scottish NFU's response is its failure to identify any influence other than supermarket and import pressure for the price correction.