Pregnancy Discrimination Act

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Pregnancy Discrimination Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1978, requiring companies with 15 or more employees to treat pregnant women the same as all other employees. That is, employers cannot fire or refuse to give hours to a woman on account of pregnancy, childbirth or a similar condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) charged in a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit filed today.
UPS, which held that an employer's failure to provide accommodations related to pregnancy could amount to sex discrimination and that liability for pregnancy discrimination does not end with the birth of the child.
Rights relating to pregnancy discrimination, to compensation for discrimination, to safety for breastfeeding mothers, to paid time off for antenatal appointments, and to equal treatment for part-time workers, are guaranteed through EU law.
The number of women pursuing pregnancy discrimination claims is also down by over a quarter (26%).
In the decades since the enactment of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act (Title VII) in 1964 and the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) in 1978, federal and state legislators have continued to address working women's unique concerns and struggles in an attempt to achieve some semblance of equality of treatment in the labor force.
in employment, rental accommodation or services customarily available to the public), there are indications of incidents involving pregnancy discrimination in today's Canada.
The new report cited statistics showing that the number of expectant and new months forced to leave their job because of concerns about the safety of their child or pregnancy discrimination has doubled over the past decade to 54,000.
Committee chairwoman Maria Miller said: "Thousands of women have no choice but to leave their work because of concerns about the safety of their child or pregnancy discrimination.
A Veneta call center is facing a federal lawsuit by a former employee who claims that pregnancy discrimination and retaliation led to her "constructive discharge" from the company late last year.
The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 can be interpreted in two obvious ways: one interpretation requires employers to make reasonable accommodations for pregnant employees, and the other does not require such accommodations.
Chronological treatment progresses from the 1890s through the New Deal, Title VII, the Equal Rights Amendment, the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978, and the Johnson Controls decision of 1991.
Coty Richardson, former assistant professor of Exercise Science at NCU in Eugene, Oregon, has sued the small school for pregnancy discrimination, marital status discrimination, gender discrimination and wrongful termination.