Pregnancy Discrimination Act


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Pregnancy Discrimination Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1978, requiring companies with 15 or more employees to treat pregnant women the same as all other employees. That is, employers cannot fire or refuse to give hours to a woman on account of pregnancy, childbirth or a similar condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Before Congress passed the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, a few noteworthy Supreme Court cases, which disagreed with the EEOC's interpretation of Title VII, demonstrated a need for statutory protections for pregnant women against discrimination in the workplace.
(21) The Fourth Circuit rejected Young's argument and articulated a strictly narrow interpretation of the PDA: "[T]he Pregnancy Discrimination Act does not, despite the urgings of feminist scholarsf,] require employers to offer maternity leave or take other steps to make it easier for pregnant women to work.
THE EARLY PROMISE OF THE PREGNANCY DISCRIMINATION ACT
Under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, "Employers must hold open a job for a pregnancy-related absence the same length of time jobs are held open for employees on sick or disability leave," the(http://www.eeoc.gov/facts/fs-preg.html) United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said.
After a history and overview, chapters are organized by specific legislation: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act; the Americans with Disabilities Act; the Age Discrimination in Employment Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978; and the Equal Pay Act.
In 1978, the United States Congress approved an amendment to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 known as the Pregnancy Discrimination Act. (4) Under this amendment, sex discrimination is defined to include actions taken "because of or on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions." (5) The act further provides that pregnancy-related medical conditions should be treated the same as medical conditions of similarly situated disabled employees.
(12) Before the administrative hearing date with FEHA, Cal Fed filed suit in the Federal District Court for the Central District of California seeking a declaration that California's Pregnancy Disability Leave Law had been preempted by the federal Pregnancy Discrimination Act. (13) Cal Fed was joined by the Merchants and Manufacturers Association and the California Chamber of Commerce in what the business community saw as an opportunity to attack the leave law.
concerns to be covered by Title VII or the Pregnancy Discrimination Act,
The Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), enacted in October 1978, outlaws employment discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.
A woman who missed work to have an abortion is protected under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), the Third Circuit recently ruled in a case of first impression.
Indeed, it took enactment of a federal law--the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978, which requires all but the smallest employers' health plans to cover pregnancy-related care--to change the situation.