Depression

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Depression

Period when excess aggregate supply overwhelms aggregate demand, resulting in falling prices, unemployment problems, and economic contraction.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Depression

A particularly long and/or deep recession. While there is no technical definition of a depression, conventionally it is defined as a period featuring severe declines in productivity and investment and particularly high unemployment. During the Great Depression, for example, GDP in the United States dropped 12% between 1929 and 1930 and a further 16% the following year. Likewise, unemployment rose to more than 25% nationwide and higher in some places.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Depression.

A depression is a severe and prolonged downturn in the economy. Prices fall, reducing purchasing power. There tends to be high unemployment, lower productivity, shrinking wages, and general economic pessimism.

Since the Great Depression following the stock market crash of 1929, the governments and central banks of industrialized countries have carefully monitored their economies. They adjust their economic policies to try to prevent another financial crisis of this magnitude.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

depression

see BUSINESS CYCLE.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

depression

a phase of the BUSINESS CYCLE characterized by a severe decline (slump) in the level of economic activity (ACTUAL GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT). Real output and INVESTMENT are at very low levels and there is a high rate of UNEMPLOYMENT. A depression is caused mainly by a fall in AGGREGATE DEMAND and can be reversed provided that the authorities evoke expansionary FISCAL POLICY and MONETARY POLICY. See DEFLATIONARY GAP, DEMAND MANAGEMENT.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Johnson, Roberts, Ross, and Witten (1992) reviewed the records of 10 patients treated with Ritalin for post-stroke depression during an inpatient rehabilitation program over a 9-month period.
Socio-demographic and clinical correlates of post-stroke depression among participants
Post-stroke depression, obstructive sleep apnea, and cognitive impairment: Rationale for, and barriers to, routine screening.
Although experiments on mice showed an association between post-stroke depression and low levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and FGF-2, the link between FGF and depression is not clearly established yet (16).
High serum levels of leptin are associated with post-stroke depression. Psychol Med.
There is no concrete evidence that one particular treatment works better for post-stroke depression compared to other forms of depression, but poststroke depression is serious and needs to be treated just like any other kind of depression.
Caregiver's burden, depression and support as predictors of post-stroke depression: A cross-sectional survey.
Cerebrovascular disease basis of depression: Post-stroke depression and vascular depression.
Because post-stroke depression is often under-diagnosed and under-treated, it is an important target for quality improvement efforts in VA.
The 1990 volume covers psychosocial aspects of disability such as "Post-Stroke Depression," "Diagnosis and Management of Substance Abuse,'" "The Criminal Personality," and "Stress Addiction." The 1991 volume concentrates on critical areas of supported employment, professional ethics, and the "Effective Use of Vocational Evaluation Services." The current volume for 1992 addresses, among others, the sensitive themes of "Women and Alcoholism," and "AIDS: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management." The training materials of this program are clear, concise and comprehensive.
Giabbiconi, "Post-stroke depression and post-stroke anxiety: Prevalence and predictors," International Psychogeriatrics, vol.

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