Poor Mouth


Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms.

Poor Mouth

A slang term meaning to deny that one is rich. For example, a wealthy lawyer who visits a bar frequented primarily by blue collar workers may poor mouth herself by downplaying the success of her practice to other patrons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps we need other index entries for O'Casey, say, "as fabricator," "as poor mouth," "as own worst enemy."
The Flip-Tip blade can simplify elevation of the epiglottis in cases of spine or head trauma, immobilized neck, reduced thyromental distance, obesity, enlarged tongue, prominent upper teeth, and poor mouth opening.
The latter presents a good case for recognizing the shortcomings of Power's translation (The Poor Mouth) and, indeed, of the possible untranslatability of the text itself.
Top managers who hope to stay on with the company are by now aware of the CEO's personal choice and not about to poor mouth their future boss.
People who knew about the debt tried to use it against me in negotiations I wanted the world to know my struggle" It's hard to feel sorry for someone who adorns their two-year-old kid in furs and still spouts the poor mouth. But his honest tweets we later discovered may have been more calculated than the ramblings of a narcissistic egomaniac.
Lolita, like Pale Fire (and like The Poor Mouth), has a foreword by a fictional character, and Nabokov sees that his "impersonation of suave John Ray" makes his own discourse seem like "an impersonation of Vladimir Nabokov talking about his own book" (Lolita 311).
Sunday's Allianz League semi-final loss to Cork means that the Ulster Championship opener in Ballybofey on May 17 now becomes Donegal's sole focus and McGee doesn't buy the poor mouth talk coming out of Tyrone.
Mary Davis was painted the quango queen and ordered: "Don't play the poor mouth." David Norris got a grilling on the thorny question of the clemency letters.
Similarly, in The Poor Mouth, the presence of multiple
The Poor Mouth (An Beal Bocht), was written in Gaelic and was not available to an English-speaking audience until 1973, thirty-three years after it was initially published.
Originally written in 1941 (and later translated by the author himself as The Poor Mouth) it is witty, surreal and poignant.