polluter pays principle

(redirected from Polluter-pays principle)

polluter pays principle

see POLLUTION.

polluter pays principle

the principle that polluters should bear the SOCIAL COSTS of any POLLUTION that they cause. Adoption of this principle as part of government policy towards the environment involves intervening in markets to protect the environment by placing the onus of
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"The Commission will not hesitate to take action against Member States where national legislation and / or practice is not in line with the polluter-pays principle," the EC's Environment General Director said to the Bulgarian Industrial Association.
Brune Poirson reminded members of the board of directors of Eco-DDS (Castorama, Auchan, Carrefour, Leroy Merlin, Bricorama, PPG, etc.) that it is their responsibility - as business drivers on the market and in application of the polluter-pays principle - to ensure the management of the waste resulting from the products they market.
He said Bahrain's environment policy was based on the precautionary principle, the polluter-pays principle, the sustainability concept and the concept of shared responsibility.
Wouldn't it be a good idea for Ministers to use the polluter-pays principle to impose a clean-up tax on the chewing gum manufacturers?
The two NGOs believe that unless the polluter-pays principle is correctly applied, the main objective of the Directive, i.e.
Adopting an own-initiative report by Caroline Lucas (Greens/EFA, United Kingdom) on 5 July by 439 votes to 79 with 102 abstentions, the assembly, sitting in plenary session in Strasbourg, urged the European Commission to tackle the problem and apply the polluter-pays principle to the aviation sector.
& POL'Y 55, 55 (1992) ("The polluter-pays principle has been accepted by the majority of industrialized nations as the mechanism for controlling global pollution." (internal citations omitted)).
According to the polluter-pays principle, this responsibility lies with the waste producer, usually a health care provider or an establishment involved in related activities.
The most famous of the OECD Guiding Principles is the "Polluter-Pays Principle." The other principles pertain to harmonization, national treatment and nondiscrimination, and compensating import levies and export rebates.(2) While these issues remain part of today's debate on trade and environment, the OECD Guiding Principles are somewhat antiquated and require reexamination.
These principles include, in particular, the precautionary pronciple, the prevention principle, the principle that environmental damage should be rectified at source as a priority and the polluter-pays principle.
It also stressed that more tax incentives should be introduced and used, particularly with respect to the polluter-pays principle, and that cogeneration should be encouraged.
Following an in-depth investigation, opened in December 2004, the Commission took the view that the polluter-pays principle applied to nuclear liabilities and that operators of nuclear plants should cover their decommissioning costs.