Zionism

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Zionism

The political view that Jews have a right to national homeland in Palestine roughly corresponding to the borders of Biblical Israel. Zionism emerged as a nationalist movement in 19th-century Europe as secular and assimilated Jews did not find wide acceptance in European society. Many, though not all, early Zionists were socialists; this led to the establishment of communal farms in Palestine. Religious Zionism was initially a minor part of the movement, but has grown in importance since the 1960s. After the establishment of the States of Israel in 1948, the Zionist movement has concentrated on maintaining or expanding Israel's borders and/or influence. Proponents of Zionism believe a Jewish homeland is the only place Jews can be perfectly safe from persecution, while critics contend that Palestinian Arabs have been displaced and discriminated against since the early 20th century.
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In the largest, most comprehensive biography of Jacob Schiff to date, Naomi Cohen argues that Schiff "envisioned an under-taking [sic] joining Zionists and non-Zionists, Orthodox and Reform, on a non-political platform--not to advance the progress of political Zionism but to foster Jewish unity." (6) Although she notes that his "determination to shield" Palestinian development projects from "nationalist control" created tension, she argues that over time, Schiff's cooperation with Zionists weakened his differences with them.
It is in this sense, as I hope to show, that Rosenzweig's theology not only goes hand in hand with his charge against a historicist temporality which constitutes a territorial imagination but also issues a challenge to political Zionism from out of the sources of Judaic thought itself.
Masalha's own orientation to the question he asks in his introduction: "But does the Bible justify political Zionism, the military conquest and destruction of historic Palestine by the Israelis in 1948, and the current Israeli building of the separation/apartheid wall in occupied Palestine?" (20) and the answers he supplies in that same introduction--rather than scientifically and objectively examining the material without preconception (despite difficulty) and arriving at conclusions based on an accurate presentation of the material itself.
Probably because Israeli public life since its founding has been so dominated by animosity between the party of Ben-Gurion and the party of Jabotinsky, the founder of political Zionism, born in Budapest on May 2, 1860, has received less public notice than one might expect.
Israel's regime of control over the Palestinians, both those in the Occupied Territories as well as those with citizenship in the pre-1967 borders, is a response to political Zionism's historic and contemporary dilemma: how to create and maintain a Jewish state in a land with a non-Jewish population.
Herzl, the founder of political Zionism, did not claim to belong to a religion: "I do not obey a religious impulse," he said....
What is most evident in his 1946 booklet, Palestine peace and prosperity or war and destruction, Political Zionism undemocratic, unjust, dangerous, is his relative indifference to the rights of the Jewish victims of Nazism.
Mahoney notes in his article on "Political Zionism: Its Historical Origins and Growth," President Harry Truman, who recognized Israel ten minutes after it declared its independence on May 14, 1948, frankly declared why he did it: "I do not have hundreds of thousands of Arabs among my constituents" (p.
Jews then would have to make their own liberal state through the movement of political Zionism. But how would they remain Jews in a liberal state?
Here Anderson parts company with writers such as Stephen Sizer, whose recent book, Christian Zionism: Road Map to Armageddon (InterVarsity Press, 2005) claims a definitive role for premillennial dispensationalism in lending support to the aims of political Zionism. Anderson agrees with Sizer on the major impact of this eschatologically driven theology in shaping particularly the American evangelical narrative on Israel.
What I am against is political Zionism, which is driving the country now.
Political Zionism, aiming to create a Jewish colonial state in Palestine, preceded the Holocaust and the Nazis.