Spear

(redirected from Pointy stick)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Spear

In auto sales, a tactic in which a salesperson speaks with a person away from the dealership site and offers an impossibly high price for a trade-in, provided the person comes to the dealership that same day to finalize the deal. The intent of a spear is to encourage the customer to come back to that dealership, at which time the salesperson will quote the real price for the trade-in.
References in periodicals archive ?
The state of the turf is, as has been illustrated, best divined using a pointy stick and a labrador (optional), and in experienced hands the pointy stick produces completely satisfactory results.
Concentrate on the special effects and on poking a pointy stick in the bad guys.
Admittedly, they deserved very big, very pointy sticks in South Africa where abysmal would have complimented them, but this time around, with all the speculation about 'Arry taking over, there hasn't been much time to build the team up to can't lose proportions.
I call my author visit 'The Pointy Sticks and Loud Noises Tour' as I talk about Japanese culture, tell historical stories and wave my wooden practice bokken to demonstrate how clumsy I was at sword ighting classes.
So this was Britain in the grip of a pandemic; all paper masks and pointy sticks, but very little sympathy for the coughing, aching patients who crawl up seeking advice.
Bitesize episodes on the more fascinating, and the downright bizarre antics of our wacky ancestors are included - cat pianos, putrefying pontiffs and Vlad the Impaler and his pointy sticks all get an airing, along with other such characters you may recognise from history lessons of old.
They, with great strategic cunning, and one of those pointy sticks, realised there were seven live football matches on.
I would have one of those impressive big pointy sticks, and I would trace the inevitable decline caused by marriage.
The too-common MSM response is to dismiss bloggers as "salivating morons" who sit in their pajamas in dank dens, jabbing journalism's soft spots with pointy sticks.