Plutocrat

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Plutocrat

A person with real or perceived political authority due to his/her vast wealth. For example, a person who donates vast sums to candidates of all major parties in order to have influence no matter who wins may be called a plutocrat. The term is highly derogatory.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Selected extracts from Templar's article reproduced below may provide an idea about the misdeeds of plutocrats and kleptocrats from 2008 to 2018: 'As per the unholy charter of kleptocracy (Charter of Democracy signed by late Benazir Bhutto and Nawaz Sharif), Sharif kept silent during Zardari's plunder, and he returned the favour after Sharif took over in 2013.
But that won't happen, because a cadre of right-wing plutocrats and corporate kingpins, many of whom are tied to or influenced by white supremacy ideology, now control many levels of government and oppose climate action.
To Trump's team, this is collateral damage, the inevitable price that must be paid to give America's plutocrats more money.
This is a lesson for all countries contemplating corporate tax breaks -- even those without the misfortune of being led by a callow, craven plutocrat.
Increasing inequality as a key driver of this shift: more than ever before, contemporary plutocrats fund intellectuals and idea factories that generate arguments that align with their own.
John D Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie, plutocrats of the Gilded Age, used their money against their enemies, to be sure, enemies that included newspapers and magazines that disagreed with them for all sorts of reasons.
The plutocrats' wealth grew from 7 percent of all U.S.
At this year's Cannes Film Festival, there seemed to be more partying plutocrats than there were hungry sales agents.
"The super-wealthy plutocrats, who we all think should pay the mansion tax, probably through using their lawyers and accountants will evade it but you could be a teacher in Hackney, who bought a house in the 1980s for PS50,000 and it's worth PS1m and climbing.
Spoils from the war will now embellish avaricious plutocrats with exorbitant future profits from Iraq's vast undeveloped crude oil resource.
The plain truth is that the whole of this reform charade is driven to straighten up some ruffles in the electoral dispensation that a section of our plutocrats whine lead up to electoral frauds.
People now know that we can't lift up the poor without pulling down the plutocrats. It's understood that we can have democracy or billionaires, not both.