Plastic

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Plastic

A slang term for a credit card, especially when being used to make frivolous or luxurious purchases.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A recent study has shown that humans have ingested plastics in the form of microplastics.
In line with the state government's intention to ban single-use plastics and plastic straws, Phee said they will need to look at how to reduce the reliance on single-use plastic shopping bags.
This year's Earth Day was dedicated to ending global plastic pollution.
The state of Oregon has reported that the recycling rate for rigid plastic containers in the state declined in 2005 to 24.3 percent.
Fortunately, innovative plastics are currently available as alternatives to those that are facing regulatory restrictions.
So the issue is one of lowering the CTE for plastics. And Buckmaster says that they're working on two different materials for body panels that have reduced CTE.
But if there's a place that manufactures it somewhere near you, that business likely will accept it, says John Gogol, president of PC Plastics in Oregon.
The American Plastics Council respectfully requests that EHP address the misinformation that appeared in these articles and which is available on the EHP website.
There are other problems with plastic. When certain plastics deteriorate, they release chemicals that may act as endocrine disruptors and interfere with normal hormone functioning in animals and humans.
Improved screw designs for wire and cable extrusion have typically come from extruder equipment manufacturers or polymer compound suppliers, whose main focus has been on pelletized plastics. Over the past 35 years, a variety of screw designs for plastics extrusion have been developed and marketed, typically centered around the classic metering-type geometry with a deep feed section, tapered transition section and shallow metering section.
For the last century, technology has blossomed in an age of plastics. We drive cars with plastic parts, we wear eyeglasses with plastic lenses, and we sip mineral water from plastic bottles.
In fact, since today's plastics are lighter in weight than ever before, they take up even less space in landfills than they used to.

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