new town

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new town

In keeping with the expression “all things old are new again,”modern residential development is focusing on a small-town atmosphere called the new town concept.It includes sidewalks and community parks plus offices,retail,places of worship,and schools within the project itself and usually within walking distance of residential areas.It may even include some home-above-retail or home-above-office concepts and satellite offices for government services such as license renewal.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the latest digs demonstrate, these were planned towns covering tens of hectares at a time when a royal palace such as that at Yeavering in Northumberland covered perhaps one or two hectares.
However, it was residents of Corner Brook, both planned town and fringe, who ultimately developed a broader sense of place.
"It's also a home of the railways, an industrial powerhouse and a Georgian planned town.
The nineteenth century saw some planning for social purposes: Sir Titus Salt, for example, built a planned town for his mill workers at Saltaire, and housing for the deserving poor, even if you didn't employ them, became a major charity.
It's a fine example of an 18th century planned town and is within easy reach of the West Highlands, Skye, Inverness, Loch Ness, Culloden, Aviemore.
Besides these coastal projects the VCH intends to start work on Bury St Edmunds, a striking example of the medieval planned town. In the late eleventh century, its abbey was one of the most powerful and wealthy of the Benedictine houses in England and we know that it was Abbot Baldwin who laid out the town at that time.
Benjamin Lyford, a San Francisco physician and undertaker, set out to create a planned town and health spa on the Tiburon Peninsula, whose climate he considered to be "the acme of perfection." His utopian community would be called Hygeia, after the Greek goddess of health.
After retiring in 1981, Professor Kojiro made it possible for me to join in the festival of Kakunodate, a planned town of about 8000 inhabitants.
Although the last planned town was established only two years after Richmond, the movement to settle demobilized soldiers had waned and the government's strategic concerns were minor.
The principal reason for the planned town meeting was to transfer money from departments that had decided they can save from their current budgets and put the savings in an account where it would be available to help reduce next year's anticipated shortfall.