Picul


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Picul

A unit of weight in Taiwan approximately equivalent to 60 kilograms. It is used primarily in the sale of bulk foodstuffs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Within six months, as much as 10,000 piculs of 'iliahi had been cut.
Our lord has held the post [with a salary] of two thousand piculs (shi) [of grain] six times.
This place produces annually of Gold Dust about 2 Piculs, but frequently much more.
Use peaked around a decade later, when the average figure was nearly 5.2 quintals per hectare (6 piculs per bau), with more than twice that rate in some locations; G.
It was readily available on the market in Canton in varying qualities for a price of about two tael per picul. (40) This commodity was destined for sale on the intra-Asian market, as Portugal itself possessed a thriving sugar-producing industry in Madeira, the Azores, and also in Brazil after the second half of the sixteenth century.
Between 1925 and 1935 rice exports by rail from the north increased from about 650,000 piculs to 1,300,000 piculs, comprising between five and nine per cent of the total amount of rice exported from Bangkok.(24) Administrative changes at the turn of the century, which imposed money taxes for the first time, had also created new incentives on households to sell rice.(25)
68 In 1938, 33,049 picul copra was exported by the KPM and 8,250 picul by prahus; S b18/r76 MV 16-31 Dec.
Planters protested when at the beginning of the 1977-78 crop year prices were set up at [pesos]75 per picul (then about 9 cents per pound) which was significantly below production cost.
Elsewhere the Sarawak Gazette noted that a considerable number of Muruts had between them brought the fairly considerable weight of 35 and 40 piculs of gutta percha to market for trade and that:
From the catch that season, 'On 13 June, 1771, the annual junk to Amoy took, as a major part of its cargo, 3000 piculs of trepang'.
In a fourth case five years later, Zhu prosecuted his vice-minister of revenue, Guo Huan, for embezzling millions of piculs of government grain.
The first major sales of certificates in the Ming took place in 1451, 1453, and 1454 with the per certificate price of 5 piculs of rice and having it transported to Guizhou.