depreciation

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Depreciation

A non-cash expense (also known as non-cash charge) that provides a source of free cash flow. Amount allocated during the period to amortize the cost of acquiring long-term assets over the useful life of the assets. To be clear, this is an accounting expense not a real expense that demands cash. The sum of depreciation expenses of prior years leads to the balance sheet item Accumulated Depreciation.

Depreciation

The gradual reduction of an asset's value. It is an expense, but because it is non-cash, it is often effectively a tax write-off; that is, a person or company usually may reduce his/her/its taxable income by the amount of the depreciation on the asset. Because there are many different ways to account depreciation, it often bears only a rough resemblance to the asset's useful life. This may further benefit the company as they may continue to use the asset tax-free after its value has technically depreciated to nothing. See also: Amortization.

depreciation

The periodic cost assigned for the reduction in usefulness and value of a long-term tangible asset. Because firms can use several types of depreciation, the amount of depreciation recorded on corporate financial statements may or may not be a good indication of an asset's reduction in value. Depreciation not only affects the asset's value as stated on the balance sheet, it also affects the amount of reported earnings. See also Accelerated Cost Recovery System, accelerated depreciation, accumulated depreciation, recapture of depreciation, straight-line depreciation.

Depreciation.

Certain assets, such as buildings and equipment, depreciate, or decline in value, over time.

You can amortize, or write off, the cost of such an asset over its estimated useful life, thereby reducing your taxable income without reducing the cash you have on hand.

Depreciationclick for a larger image
Fig. 33 Depreciation. Two methods of calculating depreciation.

depreciation

or

amortization

  1. the fall in the value of an ASSET during the course of its working life. The condition of plant and equipment used in production deteriorates over time and these items will eventually have to be replaced. Accordingly, a firm needs to make financial provision for the depreciation of its assets.

    Depreciation is an accounting means of dividing up the HISTORIC COST of a FIXED ASSET over a number of accounting periods which correspond with the asset's estimated life. The depreciation charged against the revenue of successive time periods in the PROFIT-AND-LOSS ACCOUNT serves to spread the original cost of a fixed asset yielding benefit to the firm over several trading periods. In the period-end BALANCE SHEET such an asset would be included at its net book value (cost less cumulative depreciation deducted to date). This depreciation charge does not attempt to calculate the reducing market value of fixed assets, so that balance sheets do not show realization values.

    Different formulas used to calculate depreciation can lead to variations in the balance sheet value of a fixed asset and in the charge against GROSS PROFIT for depreciation. The second formula in Fig. 33 gives a large depreciation charge in the early periods of the fixed asset's life and a small charge in the later years (accelerated depreciation). In the interests of consistency, firms generally do not change the depreciation formula used for their fixed assets but stick to the same formula indefinitely.

    All these depreciation formulas base the depreciation charge on the historic cost of fixed assets. However, during a period of INFLATION it is likely that the REPLACEMENT COST of an asset is likely to be higher than its original cost. Therefore, prudent companies need to make PROVISION for higher replacement costs in the form of a REVALUATION RESERVE. See INFLATION ACCOUNTING, CAPITAL CONSUMPTION, APPRECIATION, CREATIVE ACCOUNTING.

  2. a decrease in the EXCHANGE RATE of a currency against other currencies under a FLOATING EXCHANGE RATE SYSTEM, reflecting a fall in market demand for that currency combined with a rise in market demand for other countries' currencies. The effect of a depreciation is to make imports (in the local currency) more expensive and exports (in the local currency) cheaper, thereby assisting in the removal of a BALANCE OF PAYMENTS deficit by acting to reduce import demand for goods and services and increasing export demand.

    Depreciations, like DEVALUATION, provide firms with an opportunity to expand sales and boost profitability by improving their price competitiveness in both home and export markets. See DEVALUATION for further discussion. Contrast with APPRECIATION, definition 2. See EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE.

Depreciationclick for a larger image
Fig. 43 Depreciation. (a) A depreciation of the pound against the dollar. (b) The effect of depreciation on export and import prices.

depreciation

INTEREST is payable on deposit accounts, normally at rates above those paid on current accounts, in order to encourage clients to deposit money for longer periods of time. Unlike with a current account, cheques cannot generally be drawn against deposit accounts. See BANK DEPOSIT.
  1. a fall in the value of a CURRENCY against other currencies under a FLOATING EXCHANGE-RATE SYSTEM, as shown in Fig. 43 (a). A depreciation of a currency's value makes IMPORTS (in the local currency) more expensive and EXPORTS (in the local currency) cheaper, thereby reducing imports and increasing exports, and so assisting in the removal of a BALANCE OF PAYMENTS deficit. For example, as shown in Fig. 43 (b), if the pound-dollar exchange rate depreciates from £1.60 to £1.40, then this would allow British exporters to reduce their prices by a similar amount, thus increasing their price competitiveness in the American market (although they may choose not to reduce their prices by the full amount of the depreciation in order to boost profitability or devote more funds to sales promotion, etc.) By the same token, the depreciation serves to raise the sterling price of American products imported into Britain, thereby making them less price-competitive than British products in the home market. In order for a currency depreciation to ‘work’, four basic conditions must be satisfied:
    1. how successful the depreciation is depends on the reactions of export and import volumes to the change in relative prices, i.e. the PRICE ELASTICITY OF DEMAND for exports and imports. If these volumes are low, i.e. demand is inelastic, trade volumes will not change much and the depreciation may in fact worsen the situation. On the other hand, if export and import demand is elastic then the change in trade volume will improve the payments position. Balance-of-payments equilibrium will be restored if the sum of export and import elasticities is greater than unity (the MARSHALL-LERNER CONDITION);
    2. on the supply side, resources must be available, and sufficiently mobile, to be switched from other sectors of the economy into industries producing exports and products that will substitute for imports. If the economy is fully employed already, domestic demand will have to be reduced and/or switched by deflationary policies to accommodate the required resource transference;
    3. over the longer term, ‘offsetting’ domestic price, rises must be contained. A depreciation increases the cost of essential imports of raw materials and foodstuffs, which can push up domestic manufacturing costs and the cost of living. This in turn can serve to increase domestic prices and money wages, thereby necessitating further depreciations to maintain price competitiveness;
    4. finally, a crucial requirement in underpinning the ‘success’ of the above factors and in maintaining long-run equilibrium is for there to be a real improvement in the country's industrial efficiency and international competitiveness. (See ADJUSTMENT MECHANISM entry for further discussion.) See BALANCE-OF-PAYMENTS EQUILIBRIUM, INTERNAL-EXTERNAL BALANCE MODEL, PRICE ELASTICITY OF SUPPLY.
    Compare APPRECIATION 1.
  2. the fall in the value of an ASSET during the course of its working life. Also called amortization. The condition of plant and equipment used in production deteriorates over time, and these items will eventually have to be replaced. Accordingly, a firm is required to make financial provision for the depreciation of its assets.

Depreciation is an accounting means of dividing up the historic cost of a FIXED ASSET over a number of accounting periods that correspond with the asset's estimated life. The depreciation charged against the revenue of successive time periods in the PROFIT-AND-LOSS ACCOUNT serves to spread the original cost of a fixed asset, which yields benefits to the firm over several trading periods. In the period end BALANCE SHEET, such an asset would be included at its cost less depreciation deducted to date. This depreciation charge does not attempt to calculate the reducing market value of fixed assets, so that balance sheets do not show realization values.

Depreciation formulas base the depreciation charge on the HISTORIC COST of fixed assets. During a period of INFLATION, however, it is likely that the REPLACEMENT COST of an asset is likely to be higher than its original cost. Thus, prudent companies need to make provision for higher replacement costs of fixed assets. See INFLATION ACCOUNTING, CAPITAL CONSUMPTION, APPRECIATION ?.

depreciation

(1) In accounting, the process of deducting some portion of the acquisition cost of property over time,as an expense against income,to reflect the fact that the property is becoming less valuable and will eventually require replacement. One cannot allow a $3,000,000 building to remain on the books for 35 years as an asset at the same value and then,suddenly one year,demol-
ish the building, write off $3,000,000 against income for that particular year, and then construct another building or move. (2) In appraisal, a reduction in the calculations for the reproduction cost of an improvement, in order to arrive at a value of the improvement in its current state, not as it would be if it were reproduced and brand new.

Depreciation

Depreciation is the deduction for the reasonable allowance for the wear and tear of assets with a life of more than one year, including real estate but not inventory, used in a trade or business or held for the production of income.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the one-hoss-shay pattern, there is no physical depreciation until the last year of the asset's life at which time the asset depreciates completely.
The physical depreciation patterns tested certainly are not collectively exhaustive and perhaps are not mutually exclusive.
4) He notes that the crucial difference between the use of the breakdown method of computing physical depreciation and using the simpler age-life method is that the breakdown method employs estimates of physical life to compute building component depreciation whereas the age-life method utilizes a ratio of effective age to economic life.
Because Marshall and Swift depreciation schedules only consider effective age and economic life, they are not amenable to calculating physical depreciation of the core structure by the breakdown method.
The convex form of the depreciation function implied by the breakdown method of estimating physical depreciation can be demonstrated by example.
When combined with the depreciation curve for the long-lived components, total physical depreciation also takes on a convex shape, which is indicative of the form of physical depreciation function implied by the breakdown method [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3 OMITTED].
If the land component of value is assumed to increase in value over time, then a forecast of estimated property value will be even more convex in form as increases in land value offset decreases in property value due to physical depreciation.
This is because the rate of physical depreciation is more rapid in early years as short-lived items age and less rapid in later years due to the relatively slow rate of decline in the value of the core structure.
Note that rents decrease relatively rapidly in the early aging years and much more gradually in the later years consistent with the breakdown method of computing physical depreciation.
Physical depreciation for each sale was based on the age/life method; effective ages for the properties were considered equivalent to chronological age, with economic lives estimated at 35 years, based on averages in Marshall & Swift Cost Service.
If the physical facility were ten years old (effective physical age), this sale would thus indicate physical depreciation of 20%.