PRK

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Related to Photorefractive keratectomy: LASIK

PRK

GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for North Korea. The code is used for transactions to and from North Korean bank accounts and for international shipping to North Korea. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Khalil et al., "Transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy: clinical results," Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery, vol.
Warrak, "Photorefractive keratectomy in patients with mild to moderate stable keratoconus: a five-year prospective follow-up study," Clinical Ophthalmology, vol.
Fleming, "Intracorneal ring segments for iatrogenic keratectasia after laser in situ keratomileusis or photorefractive keratectomy," Journal of Refractive Surgery, vol.
Midena, "Mitomycin C modulation of corneal wound healing after photorefractive keratectomy in highly myopic eyes," Ophthalmology, vol.
Jayadev, "Safety and efficacy of epi-bowman keratectomy in photorefractive keratectomy and corneal collagen crosslinking: a pilot study," Current Eye Research, vol.
Hoffart, "Corneal Scheimpflug densitometry following photorefractive keratectomy in myopic eyes," Journal of Refractive Surgery, vol.
Since the introduction of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in the year 1987 and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in the year 1990, LASIK has been preferred over PRK due to painless and rapid visual rehabilitation as well as too much less postoperative corneal haze than PRK [13,14].
EyeGate is in the clinic for two different patient populations: photorefractive keratectomy ("PRK") surgery to demonstrate corneal wound repair and punctate epitheliopathies ("PE"), which includes dry eye.
EyeGate is in the clinic for two different patient populations: photorefractive keratectomy ('PRK') surgery to demonstrate corneal wound repair and punctate epitheliopathies ('PE'), which includes dry eye.
The pivotal study will enroll up to 270 patients requiring corneal wound repair following photorefractive keratectomy, or PRK, surgery.
Previous surgical procedures that can place an eye at increased risk include: photorefractive keratectomy (PRK); extra capsular cataract extraction (ECCE); glaucoma drainage surgeries; corneal transplants; and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK).