Peter Principle


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Peter Principle

the principle, formulated by the American management writer Laurence Peter (1919-90), that in organizations people are promoted to the level of their incompetence. Individuals rise through ORGANIZATION hierarchies because job vacancies continually arise and need to be filled. The criteria for promotion is successful performance in current and previous posts. But at some point individuals are promoted to posts which are beyond the range of their abilities. From then on their job performance is characterized by incompetence, and promotion will cease. Individuals thus come to stay in jobs which they cannot adequately perform. Hence the principle that ‘every employee tends to move to their level of incompetence’.

Every organization will contain a number of people in this situation. Indeed, in time ‘every post tends to be occupied by an employee who is incompetent’. Thus organizational performance will virtually always be at suboptimum levels. The Peter Principle is generally viewed as a perceptive and humorous insight into organizational processes rather than as a proposition worthy of empirical investigation.

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In our case, the Peter Principle is spread over generations.
Peter is credited with this theory based on his book "The Peter Principle".
First propounded in the 1969 book The Peter Principle: Why Things Always Go Wrong, by Laurence J.
Tom Peters, in The Peter Principle, suggested that people are often promoted to a position for which they are ill-equipped.
In management, this is known as the Peter Principle, a process where people ascend to their level of incompetence.
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A few hours or so after Bangladesh seamer Rubel Hossain bowled Jimmy Anderson and England were knocked out of the World Cup last Monday, somebody logged on to Wikipedia and started to play around with the entry on 'The Peter Principle'--the rule that says firms promote employees to the point of their own incompetence.
Harf's naive comments betray the third-rate quality of Obama's "Dumb and Dumber'' White House staff, who prove the legitimacy of the Peter Principle every day.
“The Peter Principle states that 'every employee tends to rise to their level of incompetence.' It doesn't matter the size or the industry, it's a problem that's found just about everywhere,” says Nelson.
The Peter Principle states, "Employees tend to rise to their level of incompetence." The raid demonstrates a military variant of the Peter Principle - every successful type of operation expands to the point that it is unwieldy, impractical (aka incompetent).
"The Peter Principle," a business theory book by Canadian researcher Laurence Johnson Peter, describes the misjudgment of promoting someone to a role that he may not be a fit for merely and solely because he excelled in his current role.