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Cash Flow Matching

The practice of matching returns on a portfolio to future capital outlays. That is, cash flow matching involves investing in certain securities with a certain expected return so that the investor will be able to pay for future liabilities. Pension funds and annuities perform the most cash flow matching, as they have future liabilities that are both large and relatively easy to estimate. Portfolios that perform cash flow matching usually invest in low-risk, investment-grade securities. The practice is also called portfolio dedication, matching, or the structured portfolio strategy.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

matching

Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

matching

the process of matching revenues and profits with the associated expenses incurred in earning these revenues. See ACCRUALS PRINCIPLE OF ACCOUNTING.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in periodicals archive ?
If we consider the points in R as red and the points in B as blue, Cut(R, B) (see Section 2.2) gives us a plane perfect matching [M'.sub.P] in K(P), such that each edge in [M'.sub.P] has one endpoint in R and one endpoint in B.
In case (b), both R and B have an odd number of points and we cannot get a perfect matching in each of them.
Since |[L.sub.u]| = |[R.sub.u]|, [M.sub.u] is a plane perfect matching for [P.sub.u].
Since |[L.sub.u]| = |[R.sub.u] - {a,b}|, [M.sub.u] is a perfect matching in [P.sub.u].
Let M be any set of n edge-disjoint perfect matchings in [K.sub.n].
It is easy to see that [M.sub.1], ..., [M.sub.2k+1] are disjoint perfect matchings, and after removing them we have a complete graph on A and a graph on B, which are disjoint.
The resulting perfect matching (pairing as it contains two external edges) can be extended to a Hamiltonian cycle, but such a Hamiltonian cycle cannot contain either of [e.sub.1], [e.sub.2].
Theorem 4 shows that those edges which cannot be extended together with a perfect matching M to a Hamiltonian cycle form a matching.
Does [Q.sub.d] contain a matching M' with at most 100 edges such that, for every edge e in [Q.sub.d] - M', [Q.sub.d] contains a perfect matching M" containing e such that M [union] M" is a Hamiltonian cycle?
We start by introducing some notation in Section 2, then we prove a few basic lemmas in Section 3 and finally we do calculations and show that every Klee-graph with n [greater than or equal to] 8 vertices has at least 3 x [2.sup.(n+12)/60] perfect matchings in Section 4.
Lemma 2.1 For any Klee-graph G, the edge set E(G) can be uniquely partitioned into three pairwise disjoint perfect matchings [M.sup.1], [M.sup.2] and [M.sup.3].
For a partition of E(G') into three perfect matchings [M.sup.1.sub.G], [M.sup.2.sub.G] and [M.sup.3.sub.G], note that the edges x[v.sub.1], x[v.sub.2] and x[v.sub.3] are incident to x and therefore they belong to different sets [M.sup.i.sub.G].