Disability

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Disability

1. Any brokerage account with a restriction, or the restrictions themselves. Disabilities exist generally to prevent conflicts of interest in investment. For example, an employee of the brokerage may be unable to make certain transactions on his account with the brokerage.

2. See: Disability insurance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The meeting had taken place after people with disabilities gathered outside the CM House to mark the United Nations' International Day of Persons with Disabilities.
JICA is dispatching experts with disabilities to allow people with disabilities to overcome through their own power, the difficulties refugees with disabilities face.
She said that the new law will also guide on how to ensure that the working environment for people with disabilities is accessible for them.
Next year, the government will give a total of BGN 12 M for providing jobs for people with disabilities," Stelyanova said.
Because with people with disabilities, you don't talk philosophy, you play.
The employment rate for people with disabilities should not be substantially lower than that of the general public if there is truly equal access and opportunity.
To facilitate information workshops for people with disabilities about changes in local health care services that will be replaced by a new facility.
My degree is in political science, and my goal is to become an advocate for people with disabilities, to help them get the money and services they need to be independent.
There are still plenty of people afraid to entrust even menial jobs to people with disabilities, he said.
I have just had the opportunity to tour the department's assistive technology center, and I saw technologies that are helping people with disabilities enjoy the full range of opportunities made possible by the technology boom.
Longer term career planning issues, including issues related to career fulfillment and consideration of the interaction between occupational demands and implications associated with the progression of a disabling problem, often were overshadowed by the imminent focus on returning people with disabilities to the workforce.
In the November 21 issues, readers were asked: Do you think people with disabilities are treated fairly within the gay and lesbian community?

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