Pay the Piper


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Pay the Piper

1. To repay a debt.

2. To face a coming punishment, especially if one has made a serious mistake. One pays the piper by facing the wronged supervisor or client.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the problems start when the duplicitous mayor (Carlo Ioannou, resplendent in appropriately villainous blue velvet) refuses to pay the Piper. At which point our protagonist exacts revenge, stealing the town's 'greatest treasure'…
Asking new homeowners to pay for these upgrades, exclusively, is simply a way of masking the fact that rates have been kept artificially low--a move often meant to appease rate payers and voters--while the folks that have to pay the piper (new homeowners) become a punished class.
"Yes, I know we will have to pay the piper," he concluded, "but we really needed all of it done."
When the bloated public sector meets the unemployed who is going to pay the piper? LISA BILLETT Fishguard, Pembrokeshire
Those who pay the piper are always tempted to call the tune and we want a firm reassurance from all concerned that S4C will be able to continue to manage its own affairs.
The holidays are now over and it's time to pay the piper ...
It's likely Judge Fox will sentence her immediately since she already confessed and appears ready to pay the piper, said local DUI attorney Paul Takakjian.
I would like to point out to Nussbaum and others who continue to present their tired rationalizations that if you dance to the music you have to pay the piper. As a member of Western culture I was inundated with endless reminders of the sanctity of everything religious in Catholic life.
Neglect PM and you may get by a hundred times and only pay the piper once.
So, as always, it's the soldiers who pay the piper for politicians who, as the trumpets play the Last Post, have suddenly qualified their support of the war and emerged from their foxholes to attempt to score points with the blood of young men.