Pauper


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Pauper

A very poor person, especially one reliant on government benefits or charity. A pauper may be able to file a lawsuit without paying filing fees.
References in periodicals archive ?
ALMOST PS700,000 has been spent on "paupers' funerals" by Birmingham City Council.
EXTRACT OF THE PAUPER'S FUNERAL, BY ROBERT SOUTHEY Haunted by Poverty and woe-begone, Unloved, unfriended, thou didst journey on: Thy youth in ignorance and labour past, And thine old age all barrenness and blast!
I want to honour her in her death for what she achieved during her life and righting past and present ignominies of a pauper's burial with a memorial fitting to this woman's achievements."
Traditionally viewed as short-lived and insignificant, Honeyman argues that parish factory apprenticeships were in fact vital to pauper policies and textile manufacturing, well into the nineteenth century.
This is indeed the story of the Prince And The Pauper.
(I had no idea that "competition" could be anything but a race.) The name itself, coupled with what I knew about British aristocracy, mainly from The Prince and the Pauper, gradually blossomed to rather complicated names such as "Her Excellency Lady Manchester of Derbyshire, the First Daughter of Sir Blah of Blah." (I knew the city names from watching English Premiere League football.) I would stand in front of the bathroom mirror and recite these with pride, bowing elegantly at the passing dignitaries.
A FATHERfound hanged in prison just five days into adoublelife sentence for the brutal murder of his two young sons was likely to receive a pauper's funeral,acoroner's officer said yesterday.
By 1844 there were about 1,600 patients in East London in privately-run houses for pauper lunatics paid for by the parishes from poor relief, and 200-300 more in `private paying customer' establishments.
Best-selling author Harold Robbins died a pauper with the taxman chasing him.
government are united in a humongous conspiracy to strip him of all his money, redistribute it to deadbeat bureaucrats, and turn him into a pauper. He's much too sophisticated for that."
As early as November 23, 1877, Twain set down this idea for a story in his notebook: "Edward VI and a little pauper exchange places by accident a day or so before Henry VIII's death.
'Jomo Kenyatta was a son of a pauper. He struggled and was detained by the colonialists for many years.