Paul v. Virginia

(redirected from Paul vs. Virginia)

Paul v. Virginia

An 1869 court case in the United States concerning insurance regulation. The Supreme Court held that a corporation is not a citizen of the U.S. under the privilege and immunities clause of the Constitution; that is, a state may treat corporations organized in another state differently from its own corporations. Additionally, the Court decided that the sale of an insurance policy did not constitute an Act of commerce and therefore the federal government could not regulate insurance at all. This decision was largely overturned in 1944. See also: United States v. South-Eastern Underwriters Association.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1868 ruling in Paul vs. Virginia found that a New York agent's business in Virginia didn't constitute interstate commerce, as the policies were mere local contracts, not real, tradable goods moving across state lines.
Two years later, the Paul vs. Virginia ruling destroyed the underpinnings of that bill, creating a legal preserve in which state regulation became deeply rooted over the next several decades.
The association had argued it wasn't subject to the provisions of the Sherman Act, based on the Paul vs. Virginia decision.