USA PATRIOT Act

(redirected from Patriot Act I)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

USA PATRIOT Act

Legislation in the United States, enacted in 2001 shortly after the September 11 terrorist attacks, that increased the federal government's surveillance and enforcement powers with the intent of combating terrorism. Among other provisions, it expanded the powers of the Secretary of the Treasury to monitor financial transactions, especially internationally, and cracked down on money laundering.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, stopping Patriot Act II will not, by itself, stop the emerging police state; there are still many hidden trap doors to Patriot Act I that could hold very unpleasant surprises.
The Patriot Act I can definitely be viewed as a major link in the chains of slavery; Patriot II would go a long way toward finishing the task.
It is crucial to note that the sunsets are not the end of the story; further reform of the Patriot Act is necessary.
At base, the debate over the Patriot Act is about how America wants to be governed, and how much latitude we are willing to give government agents to spy on and investigate Americans under the broad banner of "national security.
The new exception prodded by the USA Patriot Act is narrowly tailored to terrorism and allows federal law enforcement officials access to student records without the consent of the student--if there is reason to believe that individual may be involved in terrorist activity.
If the PATRIOT Act is constitutional and badly needed, why were sunset provisions included at all?
The real problem with the Patriot Act is not the law, but the abuse of the law.
If the Justice Department's interpretation of the PATRIOT Act is accepted by the courts, any lawyer who represents a terrorism suspect can be charged with a crime if the government claims his client's directives also represent the directives of the terrorist organization the client is accused of serving.