Gambling

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Related to Pathological Gambling: trichotillomania

Gambling

The act of wagering on an event or a game of chance in which the outcome is uncertain. This includes card games such as poker or bets on sporting events. In U.S. tax, all gambling income, regardless of where or how it was obtained, is taxable income and must be reported to the IRS. Professional gamblers may deduct all gambling losses against gambling income, but casual gamblers may only do so up to the amount of their gambling income.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarities and differences between pathological gambling and substance use disorders: a focus on impulsivity and compulsivity.
Comparative effectiveness of three therapeutic modalities in the psychological treatment of pathological gambling: Long-term outcome.
Table 4 presents the results of the screening and diagnostic instrument of problem gambling and pathological gambling for the past year.
Prevalence and predictors of pathological gambling: Results from the St.
Even after pathological gambling was first listed as a disorder in the DSM-III, academics continued to debate whether the disorder should be designated as an impulse-control disorder or as an addiction.
Antisocial personality disorder, pathological gambling, and substance use disorders are highly comorbid.
Pathological gambling: A review of the literature (prepared for the American Psychiatric Association Task Force on DSM-IV Committee on disorders of impulse control not elsewhere classified).
(2010) identified at least four types of pathological gambling patients according to personality variables.
Scores range from 0 to 20, with scores of 5 or higher reflecting probable pathological gambling, and scores of 3-4 indicating problem gambling (e.g., Bondolfi et al.
"People with pathological gambling addiction may consult their GP for advice and recommendations for appropriate support, which in some cases can be provided by specialist addiction nurses, counsellors or psychiatrists."
A large multi-centre investigation (the DOMINION study) of 3,090 patients with PD revealed that impulse control disorder (ICD) was identified in 13.6% of PD patients; specifically, pathological gambling in 5%, compulsive sexual behaviour in 3.5%, compulsive buying in 5.7% and binge-eating disorder in 4.3%.50 The prevalence of ICD rises to 14% for patients taking dopamine agonists, compared with 0.7% for patients taking levodopa alone.

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