Pass the book

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Pass the book

The process of transferring responsibility for a brokerage firm's trading account from one office to another around the world in order to benefit from trading 24 hours a day.

Pass the Book

In a brokerage, to transfer orders from one office to another office. Passing the book enables a brokerage to continue trading when one exchange closes by simply going to an office that operates on an exchange that is still open. Ideally, this will enable trading 24 hours per day.
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After first reading about Earthships in The Geography of Hope by Chris Turner, I passed the book along to my dad Glen.
I even hear someone has even passed the book onto Sir Albert.
I passed the book on to four other people, and mentioned it in multiple conversations -- that's how I judge a good book.
Nevertheless, when he passed the book to his son, Andrew could see throughout its pages the evidence of his great uncle's reading activities.
I have passed the book on to several friends since and it's had a mixed reaction from each.
I passed the book on to others, starting the process of creating sustainable youth ministry.
The movie has long since passed the book as the primary method of American storytelling.
I passed the book around to friends (especially those who liked to ask when I'd be getting married), showing them the section where Kipnis lists pages of answers to the question, what can't you do because you're in a couple?
I then passed the book to a British friend who had held her husband's hand as he died, having passed long years caring for him at home.
I gave a talk in California at the Hoffman Institute, and somebody in the audience passed the book to [a staffer] for Obama.
Ambassador Aitmurzaev passed the book from President Kurmanbek Bakiev to President Musharaff who accepted the gift with gratitude and shared his warm recollections of Kyrgyzstan.
For instance, Murphy reports that Karen King, professor at Harvard Divinity School, proudly sent her book Images of the Feminine in Gnosticism to her German mentor, Hans-Martin Schenke, only to learn years later that he "had utterly no interest" in the subject and had passed the book, unread, to his wife.