participation rate

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Participation Rate

The number of persons in an economy who are willing to work, and are either working or looking for work as a percentage of the total labor force. The participation rate is one way to measure an economy's employment rate. See also: Discouraged worker.

participation rate

see ACTIVITY RATE.
References in periodicals archive ?
123) observed, "As they grew older, each successive generation of women seems to have retained the greater propensity to be in the labor force which it developed in early adulthood, and so the higher percentages of labor force members have gradually been transmitted throughout the age groups from the late 20's to the early 60's." This can be seen in figure 8, which shows the participation rates for three age groups of women (35-44, 45-54, and 55-64).
Employers that do bundle may experience additional and surprising benefits to their plans, though, in the form of higher participation rates and improved satisfaction with their provider.
The model suggests that current aggregate labor force participation rates are not far off from the models predicted trend participation rate.
The participation rates for foreign-born women and men have risen 2.9 and 2.1 percentage points respectively since 2010.
During the recent recession and recovery, for example, labor force participation has fallen sharply--and unlike unemployment rates, participation rates have shown little sign of recovery.
If your working age population isn't growing, you better be sure to have high labor force participation rates.
A PROJECT to increase participation rates in fencing and wheelchair fencing in Teesside has been given a boost.
Employment data includes but is not limited to employment rates, unemployment rates, labor force participation rates, and rates of those people not in the labor force.
Cyclical changes in the job separation, job finding, and labor force participation rates are related directly to the movements in the cyclical component of real output.
The main factor expected to drive this slowdown was a projected fall in the aggregate labour force participation rate, as an ever greater share of the population moved into older age groups, the ones historically characterised by lower labour force participation rates than for younger age groups.
It compares the shares of preK seats provided by public school systems and collaborative partners--federal or private--and analyzes participation rates based on socioeconomic and racial/ethnic subgroups and district characteristics.
The business cycle has also influenced participation, as bad times typically have been associated with lower participation rates, though the strength of this correlation is small.